5 Replies Latest reply on Jan 11, 2021 9:24 AM by Jillian Minerva

    Seeking naturalization records of Giuseppe Bonesio & Teresa Troglio

    Gabby Ostoyich Newbie

      Hello, I'm trying to find naturalization and citizenship information for my great grandparents, Giuseppe Bonesio and Teresa Troglio Bonesio. We believe Giuseppe Felice Bonesio was born in Cossila San Grato, Italy on November 11, 1908 and came to the U.S. on December 6, 1919 with his mother, Maria Coda Bonesio.  He died on November 13, 1994 in Ulster, New York.  I am wondering if there are records of the year he naturalized to become a U.S. citizen.  I would also like to know if Giuseppe had to renounce his Italian citizenship in order to naturalize. We believe Giuseppe's wife, Teresa Troglio, was born in New York on July 20, 1908 to Italian immigrants.  Like her husband, she died in Ulster, New York on April 25, 2004.  Although Teresa was born in New York, her father was later conscripted to fight for Italy in WWI and the family traveled back to their home-country.  I'm looking for records of Teresa's citizenship, and whether or not she held both Italian and American citizenship.  Did she also renounce her Italian citizenship, and if so, when?  We believe her father was Luigi Colombano Troglio (b. November 1878 ; d. March 1970) and her mother was Maria Valla (b. March 16, 1879). Thank you so much for any and all help!  It's greatly appreciated.      

        • Re: Seeking naturalization records of Giuseppe Bonesio & Teresa Troglio
          Grace Yuhasz Adventurer

          I found some documents that may help you.  Unfortunately, I don’t know anything about how Italian citizenship works.

           

          The links below are all from FamilySearch.org.  You would need to sign up for a free account to access them.

           

          Giuseppe and his mother arrived in NY on the DANTE ALIGHIERI on 4 Dec 1919.

          New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924

          They are on line 21 & 22.   The form is two pages so make sure to look at the next page, as well.

          https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J67F-GPD

           

          Giuseppe Bonesio

          New York, Southern District, U.S District Court Naturalization Records, 1824-1946

          There are four pages.  The first is the little Certificate of Arrival (it was filmed twice), followed by the Declaration of Intention to Naturalize, then the front and back of the Petition. He swore the Oath of Allegiance on 14 May 1934.  At the time he filled out the form, he stated he was single.

          https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:8M3B-HQPZ

           

           

          Check to see if the following is the correct Teresa Troglio.

           

          Teresa Troglio

          New York, New York City Births, 1846-1909

          Born on 20 Jul 1908 in Brooklyn, Kings, NY

          Parents Columban Troglio and Maria Valla

          https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:2WZL-BMW

           

          Teresa Troglio

          New York, New York Passenger and Crew Lists, 1909, 1925-1957

          She and her family returned to the U.S in 1928.  The form states she is a U.S. citizen.  Make sure to look at the second page, too.

          https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:24X8-F2H

           

          Hope this helps.  Happy Hunting!

          • Re: Seeking naturalization records of Giuseppe Bonesio & Teresa Troglio
            Susannah Brooks Tracker

            Joseph Bonesio was naturalized 14 May 1934 in the US District Court for the Southern District of NY.  As part of the process on both his Declaration of Intention and Petition for Naturalization he had to renounce his allegiance to the state of Italy  and its king. 

             

            When Teresa Troglio, her parents, and her sister arrived at the port of NY on 7 Dec 1928, there was a stamp before Teresa's and her sister's names stating US Cit. They both had US passports issued 13 Sep 1928 in New York.  Their parents were considered Italian citizens.

            • Re: Seeking naturalization records of Giuseppe Bonesio & Teresa Troglio
              Jillian Minerva Newbie

              Dear Ms. Ostoyich,

               

              Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

               

              We searched the National Archives Catalog and located the Population Schedules for the 1940 Census in the Records of the Bureau of the Census (Record Group 29) that includes the schedule sheet for New York - Queens County - ED 41-602 (see p. 6A). It indicates that Joseph/Giuseppe Bonesio was naturalized and Teresa Troglio Bonesio was a citizen. The sheet has been digitized and is available using the Catalog.

               

              We also located the Petitions for Naturalization, 1824-1991 of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York in the Records of District Courts of the United States (Record Group 21) that includes a declaration of intent (20 Jul 1928) and a petition for naturalization (8 Feb 1934) for Giuseppe/Joseph Bonesio.  For access to these records, please contact the National Archives at New York City (RE-NY) via email at newyork.archives@nara.gov.

               

              Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and pursuant to guidance received from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), NARA has adjusted its normal operations to balance the need of completing its mission-critical work while also adhering to the recommended social distancing for the safety of NARA staff. As a result of this re-prioritization of activities, you may experience a delay in receiving an initial acknowledgment as well as a substantive response to your reference request from RE-NY. We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience.

               

              Copies of his petition for naturalization and declaration of intent are available via Ancestry. There may be a fee for using Ancestry. Instead, check for access at your local library as many library systems subscribe to these sites, making them free for their patrons.

               

              In most cases, the National Archives will not have a copy of the certificate of citizenship. Two copies of the certificate were created – one given to the petitioner as proof of citizenship, and one forwarded to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). All INS records are now overseen by the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). USCIS maintains duplicate copies of court records (including the certificate of citizenship) created September 27, 1906-March 31, 1956 within Certificate Files (C-Files). C-Files can be requested through the USCIS Genealogy Program.

               

              We hope this is helpful. Best of luck with your family search!