4 Replies Latest reply on Aug 5, 2021 7:02 PM by Debrah Justice

    Seeking ancestor on Dawes Roll

    Judy Wininger Newbie

      I'm trying to find a direct ancestor that was on Dawes Roll. My 7th great grandfather was Little Carpenter, Attakullakulla

        • Re: Seeking ancestor on Dawes Roll
          Alice Lane Pioneer

          Hi Judy,

          Welcome to History Hub

           

          Very interesting family that you have.

          Hope these help

           

          search the Dawe's Rolls

          Search the Dawes Final Rolls | OHS (okhistory.org)

           

          Found him on findagrave.com with biography

          Little Carpenter Attakullakulla (1708-1778) - Find A Grave Memorial

           

          family tree is on familysearch.org. It is a free website, you will need to register and join to search

          Chief Little Carpenter Attakullakulla (1708–1778) | Person | Family Tree | FamilySearch

           

           

          Alice Lane

          Research Volunteer

          1 person found this helpful
          • Re: Seeking ancestor on Dawes Roll
            Cara Jensen Tracker

            Dear Ms. Wininger,

             

            Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

             

            The National Archives (NARA) only has custody of records created by the federal government that document tribal nations during American nationhood, and even then records are sparse until the mid 19th century. Since the Cherokee were an Eastern tribal nation and part of the early removals, the NARA only has custody of records for the tribe that date back to the 1830s when the first removal rolls were compiled.

             

            The Dawes records are only from a very specific point in time, 1898-1914, and were of individuals living in what was called the Indian Territory in present day Oklahoma. If an individual was not there, then he or she would not be captured in those records. If an individual was listed on the Dawes final rolls, they should have an enrollment packet. Please see the National Archives Dawes Records: Enrollment and Land Allotment Jackets website for more information.

             

            We suggest that you begin by assembling as much of your family tree as possible, as far back as you can go, and then search for relations during the time frame that you seek. 

             

            In addition to the information from the previous poster, we suggest that you search other nationwide Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) censuses indicated here in Free US Indian Census Rolls 1885-1940. Please see the History Hub response Seeking names of Cherokee relatives for a previous response to another post that may be useful.

             

            We hope this is helpful. Best of luck with your family research!

             

            1 person found this helpful
            • Re: Seeking ancestor on Dawes Roll
              Jolene Clark Newbie

              If your ancestor was alive in the 1700s he would not be on the Dawes Rolls. The Dawes Rolls were created around 1900. You would need to use U.S. Census records and trace your family back to the 1900 Census. In 1900 the government used a "Special Inquiries Relating to Indians" questionnaire that will help you determine the tribe. When you have the correct name from the Census records, then you can search the Dawes Roll for your ancestors name.

              • Re: Seeking ancestor on Dawes Roll
                Debrah Justice Newbie

                You can access the Dawes Roll online for free.

                Attakullakulla is on that roll. Is that who you are looking for?

                 

                It is possible that a particular ancestor you are looking for may not be on the Dawes Roll. There were other rolls you may want to search.

                 

                Some tribal members may not be on the rolls at all. This is because they werent living on reservation land at the time the [Indian] census  [the "Rolls"] were taken. I couldnt find one of my particular ancestors but found her children, and then found out she had married a white and moved off the reservation.