1 Reply Latest reply on Oct 6, 2020 11:11 AM by Cara Jensen

    Seeking Williamson Family in Alabama

    Sandra Johnston Newbie

      I've searched but can't find without doubt who the parents of my gg-grandparents were.  My gg-grandparents names are William (MNU) Williamson and  Frances (possibly Mary "Frances") Couch.  Per the 1850 Randolph Co., AL census, they were both born in GA circa 1825. Exactly where in GA, and to whom they were born I don't know, but I've found a probable but unproven match for Frances, that being Joseph Couch and Rosanah Bass who were enumerated on the 1850 and 1860 Spartanburg, SC censuses.  I'm seeking clarification and confirmation on both the Williamson and Couch uplines. Although William and Frances (Couch) Williamson are shown to have been born in GA, it appears they both grew up in AL.   As for William, I'm still as confused as ever about his upline heritage.  I'm curious about what the link might be between William and Frances and the Williamson and Collier families living in cluster beside them, as evidenced on the 1850 Randolph Co., AL census.  I've wondered if the Merrill Collier living two doors down from William and Frances might have been married to one of William's sisters.  By 1850 Merrill Collier was remarried to his first cousin from GA, but his first wife was named Lokie Williamson.  I still haven't been able to determine how William might have been related to his other neighbor, H.A. or H.J."Hud" (or maybe Huel?) Williamson who lived next door to him and Frances for what appears to have been a number of years.  I have lots of clues but can't seem link them in any way.

       

      William Williamson was incorrectly enumerated with the Williams surname on the 1850 Randolph Co., AL census.  However, his wife Frances was shown as a Williamson right beneath his name, with three toddler sons:  W.W. age 3, James age 2 and John age 1.  It appears that both William and Frances and their children were illiterate.  To date, the 1850 AL census record appears to be the only known document that supports their family unit ever existed.  Randolph County, AL has no known existing county resident/property records for the era when the Williamson family resided there.  It appears that William and Frances died either in Randolph or Cleburne Co., AL.  William died circa 1858 and Frances circa 1867; however, I've found no death/cemetery record information for either one.  William's approximate year of death was calculated based on Frances having been remarried with a 7 month old child on the 1860 AL census, with that child having been born around Dec. 1859.  Frances' date of death appears to have been late in 1866 or early in 1867, as her 2nd husband, John Smith (thought to be one and the same as John Straley Smith who remarried a widow named Elizabeth (Hanson) Ham in the spring of 1867 in Heard Co, GA). remarried in the spring of 1867.  The 10 year old child in the home of John Smith and his 2nd wife  Elizabeth on the 1870 Cleburne Co. AL census, is a perfect match to be  7 month old D.J. Smith who was enumerated in the John and Frances (Couch) Williamson-Smith home on the 1860 Randolph County, AL census.  Also, Frances (Couch) Williamson-Smith's Williamson children were also enumerated in the Smith home on the 1860 census, but were recorded with the Williams surname.

       

      By the 1870s, all the children of William and Frances Williamson had left the Randolph/Cleburne Co., AL area.  Their daughter Susan M.(Williamson) Hale-Frasier ended up in AR by the 1880s.  Their son William Washington (W.W.) lived out his life in Huntland, TN.  Their son James has not been located.  Their son John Merrill died in Burnet Co., TX and his brother Elisha "Lish" Walton died in adjacent Travis Co., TX.

       

      it's the "up line" of both my Williamson and Couch ancestors that has me stumped.  I'm trying to locate and confirm information that is more than an "assumed" match..  My aunt recalled being told our Williamson line settled in Isle of Wight, VA, when they came to America, most likely from England in the 1600s.