7 Replies Latest reply on Oct 6, 2020 12:14 PM by Joseph Faltin

    Seeking date & place of naturalization of Leopoldo Paletta

    Joseph Faltin Newbie

      Where & when did Leopoldo Paletta become a US citizen? He was born on January 30, 1866 in Cetraro, Italy and died on March 22, 1939 in New York, New York (Queens). He married Giugliema Migliano on November 19, 1892 in Serignan-Herault, France. He arrived in New York on December 21, 1901 on the SS Patria with Giugliema and 3 children: Pietro (11 yrs old), Alfriedo (8 yrs old), Noeli (not yet one yr old). They had two more children after 1901.

        • Re: Seeking date & place of naturalization of Leopoldo Paletta
          Susannah Brooks Scout

          I am very confused because I find Leopoldo arriving twice.

          I Apr 1895 arriving in NY on the LaBourgogne  with his wife and oldest child, Pietro

          18 Dec 1901 arriving in NY on the Patria with his son Alfredo (born in the US) & his mother?

          These 3 people were detained until 21 Dec 1901 according to a list at the end of the passenger list.

          I have not found Giugliema and Noeli (Lena) arriving back in the US, although all records indicate that Noeli was born in France. 

           

          In the 1915 & 1925 NY state censuses  Leopoldo, his wife, & his daughter Lena were listed as aliens & the other children as citizens.  Pietro was not in the household at this time

          In the 1930 US census Leopoldo (Paul) & his wife are listed as aliens and his daughter's (Lena's) status is listed as unknown.

          If Leopoldo was naturalized it would had have been after April 1930.  I have not been able to find any naturalization record for him in the NYC area.

          • Re: Seeking date & place of naturalization of Leopoldo Paletta
            Cara Jensen Scout

            Dear Mr. Faltin,

             

            Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

             

            Beginning on September 27, 1906, the responsibility for naturalization proceedings was transferred to the Federal courts. If his naturalization took place in a Federal court in New York City, his declaration of intention (with any accompanying certificates of arrival), and petition for naturalization may be in the custody of the National Archives at New York (RE-NY).  Please email RE-NY at newyork.archives@nara.gov  for a search by including the name of petitioner (including known variants); date of birth; approximate date of entry to the US; approximate date of naturalization; where the individual was residing at the time of naturalization (city/county/state); and country of origin.

             

            In most cases, the National Archives will not have a copy of the certificate of citizenship. Two copies of the certificate were created – one given to the petitioner as proof of citizenship, and one forwarded to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS).

            Certificates of citizenship were issued by the Federal courts until October 1991 when INS took over responsibility for naturalization proceedings. All INS records are now overseen by the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). USCIS maintains duplicate copies of court records (including the certificate of citizenship) created since September 27, 1906 and may be requested through the USCIS Genealogy Program.

             

            Since he was listed as AL (Alien status) in the 1915 NY Census and the 1930 US Census, it also is possible that Leopoldo did not complete the naturalization process. Naturalization is not required in the U.S. In the late 1800s/early 1900s, based on census statistics, around 25% of immigrants in the U.S. had not pursued citizenship.  We suggest that you review NARA’s Naturalization Records website for an overview of the naturalization process and the FamilySearch wiki for Naturalization Terms and Acronyms.

             

            We suggest that you contact the New York City Municipal Archives for assistance in ordering a death certificate for Pietro Paletta.

             

            We hope this is helpful. Best of luck with your research!