12 Replies Latest reply on Sep 24, 2020 6:47 PM by Donna Travis

    Seeking explanation of LST- 332 Muster Roll

    Donna Travis Wayfarer

      My Great Uncle served in the Navy in WWII and I am interested in understanding how to read parts of one of his Muster Rolls. I have highlighted what I think is important about him. I understand most of it except for V-6 under Branch of service and STAFF LST FLOT 12. Thank you for any help.WW II Navy Muster Roll

        • Re: Seeking explanation of LST- 332 Muster Roll
          Alex Daverede Adventurer

          Donna,

           

          The V-6 designation means that your relative enlisted in the Voluntary Reserve under the Naval Reserve Act of 1938.   This was a wartime only status as members of the Voluntary Reserve did not drill or perform regular training duties.  This meant that your great uncle carried the title USNR behind his name and rank.

           

          As for the assignment to the staff of LST Flotilla12, Navy ships and craft are usually assigned to an administrative command consisting of similar ships and craft.  For Landing Ships, Tank a Flotilla consists of two LST Groups, each of which had a dozen LST’s.  Your great uncle would have been a Seaman First Class on the staff of the flotilla, which would have been the command of a captain.  The flotilla staff would have stationed aboard one of the LST’s. 

          I hope you find this information useful.

           

          A. J.

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            • Re: Seeking explanation of LST- 332 Muster Roll
              Donna Travis Wayfarer

              Alex,

               

              Thank you so much, this is extremely helpful. I have been quite confused about this for awhile now and it is great to finally have the answers!

               

              It does bring up a few questions for myself and my family as My Great Uncle was aboard one of the "crafts" taking men and/or.... I do not know exactly what boat he was aboard (the LCT or one of the smaller vessels used in the transport to the beach) when he sustained his injury just that it was during one of the waves of craft to the beach. However this Staff LST Flotilla 12 sounds as if he was, at least on Sept. 9, 1944 working as a staff member onboard an LST.

               

              I can not find any mention of him (Ancestry, Fold 3, FamilySearch etc) on any Muster Rolls before this one. Do you have any suggestions as to how I might find out what his service was prior to this Sept 9, 1944 Muster Roll? I knew him as a child and he had become quite crippled over the years from his injury and spent a large amount of time in and out of VA hospitals for surgery on his back and legs until his death in 1980. Again Thank You so much for all your help! One mystery down...a few more for me to clear up!

               

              Robert H. Holliday Jr.

                • Re: Seeking explanation of LST- 332 Muster Roll
                  Alex Daverede Adventurer

                  Donna,


                  LST’s were most capable of beaching on an enemy shore—it’s what they were designed to do.  So your great uncle could have been injured on any of the flotilla ships.  The problem with being one of the more junior people on a staff is that you could be assigned to duty appropriate to your rank on any flotilla ship.  If the skipper of any flotilla LST had a crew shortage, flotilla staff could be temporarily assigned (nowadays we call that “detailed”) to that ship to make up the shortage. 

                   

                  Life on amphibious ships was (and still is) difficult.  To serve on a vessel that is designed to be deliberately run up on shore is hard duty, as there are lots of big and heavy moving parts on the ship, and the ship carried large and heavy vehicles as well.  Those vehicles (tanks, trucks, artillery, etc.) had to be loaded and unloaded—evolutions that demanded a lot from the crews.  It is easy to understand how your great uncle could have been injured. 

                  As for finding any other muster rolls pertaining to your great uncle’s naval service, the best thing I can recommend is to get his service record.  NARA has a process by which you can request the service records.  From there you can find out what commands to which he was assigned.  If you pinpoint specific ships to which your relative was, you could find the ship’s deck logs, which may disclose how he was injured.

                   

                  Again, I hope this info helps your research.  Good luck!

                   

                  A. J.

                  1 person found this helpful
              • Re: Seeking explanation of LST- 332 Muster Roll
                Elliot Schneider Pioneer

                Donna,

                 

                In Navy terms V-6 means General Service and Specialist (UNSNR Classification) also known as the  United States Navy Reserve.

                 

                V-6 was a classification for general service in the U.S. Naval Reserve during World War II. Most World War II U.S. Navy enlisted men were drafted into the U.S. Naval Reserve under the "V-6 Program," or "Naval Enlisted Reserve-General Duties."

                 

                Probably performed staff duties while afloat.

                 

                 

                Hope this Helps,

                 

                Elliot Schneider

                2 people found this helpful
                • Re: Seeking explanation of LST- 332 Muster Roll
                  Jason Atkinson Pioneer

                  Dear Ms. Travis,

                   

                  Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

                   

                  For the most complete record of his service, we suggest that you request a copy of his Official Military Personnel File (OMPF). OMPFs and medical records of enlisted men of the U.S. Navy who were separated from the service after 1885 and prior to 1958 are located at NARA's National Personnel Records Center (NPRC), (Military Personnel Records), 1 Archives Drive, St. Louis, MO  63138-1002.  To request these records, please mail a completed GSA Standard Form 180 to NPRC.  If there is anything requested by the form that you do not know, you may leave it blank or provide estimates, however the more information you provide, the easier it will be for NPRC staff to locate the correct file. His service number and enlistment date are listed on the muster roll you shared, so be sure to include that on the SF-180. Veterans and their next of kin also may use eVetRecs to request records. See eVetRecs Help for instructions. For more information see Official Military Personnel Files (OMPF), Archival Records Requests.

                   

                  We searched the National Archives Catalog and located the Logbooks of U.S. Navy Ships and Stations, 1941 - 1983 in the Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel (Record Group 24) that include the deck logs of the LST-332 from 6 February 1943 through its 22 May 1945. Although sick bay logs were disposed of by the Navy as temporary records, deck logs sometimes include mentions of injuries to crew members. Also, we located World War II Action and Operational Reports in the Records of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (Record Group 38) that may include reports submitted by the LST-332. For more information, please contact the National Archives at College Park - Textual Reference (RDT2) via email at archives2reference@nara.gov.

                   

                  Photographs of various U.S. Army, Navy, and Marine Corps activities dating from 1940 to 2007 are in the custody of the National Archives at College Park - Still Picture (RDSS). Please contact RDSS via email at stillpix@nara.gov to request a search for photographs of specific ships.

                   

                  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and pursuant to guidance received from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), NARA has adjusted its normal operations to balance the need of completing its mission-critical work while also adhering to the recommended social distancing for the safety of NARA staff. As a result of this re-prioritization of activities, you may experience a delay in receiving an initial acknowledgement as well as a substantive response to your reference request from RDT2 and RDSS. Also, as of June 24, the NPRC entered into Phase One of a gradual reopening process. The center is currently only servicing emergency requests associated with medical treatments, burials, homeless veterans, VA Home loan guarantees, and employment opportunities. If this is urgent, please see Emergency Requests and Deadlines. We apologize for any inconvenience.

                   

                  In addition, we located World War II War Diaries, Other Operational Records and Histories, ca. 1/1/1942 - ca. 6/1/1946 in the Records of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (Record Group 38) that contain war diaries and reports concerning LST-332 and LST Flotilla 12 during World War II. These records have been digitized and may be viewed online using the Catalog.  Please note that the Catalog does not always list files in chronological order.

                   

                  Plus, we located Moving Images Relating to Military Activities, ca. 1947 - 1980 in the General Records of the Department of the Navy (Record Group 428) that includes the film INVASION OF FRANCE: BARGES & LANDING CRAFT IN TRANSPORT AREA. CAUSEWAY, UTAH BEACH; BREAKWATER OF LIBERTY SHIPS with footage of various ships, to include brief shots of LST-332. This film has been digitized and may be viewed or downloaded online using the Catalog.

                   

                  Next, we searched the website of the Naval History and Heritage Command and located an article about LST-332 as well as 2 photographs. And the unofficial website NavSource has a page on the LST-332.

                   

                  Finally, the US LST Association may be able to assist you with your research. Members include veterans, spouses, children, and relatives.

                   

                  In regards to the U.S., World War II Navy Muster Rolls, 1938-1949 on Ancestry which you said you have already searched, our experience has been that sometimes gaps in the records, illegible records, misspellings on the original records, or errors and gaps Ancestry’s name indexing can prevent records being located using name searches. Using the “Browse this collection” option on the right hand side, we browsed the muster rolls of Staff LST Flotilla Twelve [Ship > L > LST Flotilla 12] and located two entries for Robert H. Holliday on the report of changes for September 1944. According to the report of changes, he was received on 8 September 1944 from USNAAB [United States Navy Advanced Amphibious Base], Falmouth, Cornwall and transferred to USS LST-332 on 9 September 1944.  Given that he only spent about a day on the staff, it is likely that this was simply a temporary administrative assignment so that the Flotilla staff could assign new personnel to individual ships according to their needs at the time.

                   

                  We then browsed the muster rolls for Advanced Amphibious Base, Falmouth, Cornwall, England [Shore > A > Advanced Amphibious Base > Advanced Amphibious Base, Falmouth, Cornwall, England, 9/4/43 to 7/31/45] and located him on the report of changes for September 1944, documenting his transfer to “COMLSTFLOT 12.” The muster rolls for this shore establishment indicate that he arrived at Falmouth on 4 September 1943 and was previously assigned to the NRS [Naval Receiving Station], New York, New York. Reviewing the muster roll for the NRS [Shore > R > Receiving Station, New York, NY > Receiving Station, New York, NY· 1 Jan 1939 to 29 Jun 1946 Part 12, 1 Jul to 31 Aug 1943] revealed that he arrived at the NRS on 18 July 1943 from “NavLanForEquipDepot, Norfolk, VA.”

                   

                  From there we located him on the muster rolls for the Naval Landing Force Equipment Depot Newton Park, (NOB) Norfolk, VA [Shore >  L, Landing Force Equipment > Landing Force Equipment Depot Newton Park, (NOB) Norfolk, VA· 3/10/42 to 11/15/45 Part 2] which indicates that he arrived at that unit on 4 February 1943 from “RECSHIP, New York, NY.” Going back to the Naval Receiving Station Station muster rolls, we noticed that he arrived at that unit on 26 January 1943 from “Base Two.” We were unable to locate any muster rolls for Base Two.

                   

                  We hope this is helpful. Best of luck with your family research!

                    • Re: Seeking explanation of LST- 332 Muster Roll
                      Donna Travis Wayfarer

                      Jason,

                       

                      Thank you so much!! This is the most information I have ever had on him specifically and it is wonderful to have a way to narrow my search for his world War ll Navy service. I will request his records as you suggested and thank you for the links as it will make my continued searching much easier.

                       

                      History Hub is amazing and I am so grateful for this site and for the people like you who help people like me find answers to the questions we have.

                       

                      Thank you again,

                       

                      Donna

                    • Re: Seeking explanation of LST- 332 Muster Roll
                      Robert Farris Newbie

                      According to this record he was transferred to LST-332 on 9-9-44 from the Staff Flotilla LST-12. The last operation LST-332 took part in was the Invasion of Normandy (June 1944) according to https://www.history.navy.mil/research/histories/ship-histories/danfs/l/lst-332.html .  You need to find the muster roll of Staff Flot LST-12 and find him there. You can go to August 1944 (when he was transferred out) and look backwards to find where he was transferred in and from where (mayge a hospital where he was recovering from his wound(s)?). You can keep going back like that until you get to where he entered the service (June 24, 1942). Good luck on your detective work.

                      Once you find him serving onboard a ship that took part in a landing campaign, you can find the deck log of that ship for that period and may get a better understanding of what happened in that landing. I wouldn't get my hopes up of individual sailors that were wounded being talked about in the deck log but you never know. The muster roll transfer out may give more information. I know that submarine muster rolls are pretty detailed, but have never worked with ones filled out by LST's.

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