12 Replies Latest reply on Sep 24, 2020 3:05 PM by Chuck Murray

    Seeking records of immigration to Canada

    Chuck Murray Newbie

      Asking for recommendations for online resources to search for immigration records into Canada in the early 1800's. My Great Great Grandfather was born in 1799 in Prussia and the first record I have found for him is his marriage in Wilmot, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada in January 1838. Nicholas Dienst married Barbara Unsicker married on January 2, 1838 and they moved to Ohio in 1840 settling in Portage, Ohio where they raised seven children. I am trying to find when Nicholas and Barbara came into Canada and hopefully that will lead to finding their home towns in Germany / Prussia.

        • Re: Seeking records of immigration to Canada
          Susannah Brooks Scout

          The majority of passenger arrivals in Canada begin in 1865.  There are a few other lists or substitute records starting in 1832.  This website describes the various records https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/immigration/immigration-records/Pages/introduction.aspx

          If they attended a German language church in Ohio, the baptismal records of their children might list the hometown of the parents.

          1 person found this helpful
          • Re: Seeking records of immigration to Canada
            Alice Lane Tracker

            Hi Chuck, I found this on Ancestry. Is the name Johann Nikel familiar to you

            ...Is this your Murray Family Tree?

            I don't have a subscription to Ancestry at the moment, just got this snip for you.

            Alice Lane,

            Research Volunteer

             

            Barbara Unsicker found in 10 trees

             

             

             

            1. Barbara Unsicker from tree Murray Family Tree

              Birth1808 Bayern, Germany
              Marriagedd mm year city, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
              Residenceyear city, Wood, Ohio, USA
              Deathdate date year city, Wood, Ohio, USA
              SpouseNicholas (Johann Nikel) Dienst (1799-year)

               

              317 People2 Records2 Sources
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              • Re: Seeking records of immigration to Canada
                Chuck Murray Newbie

                Alice,

                Thanks very much for taking a look at my post. Yes that is my tree on Ancestry and Johann Nikel Dienst is a hypothesis with the closest birth date I have found to the Nicholas Dienst I am researching. I know he was in Waterloo, Ontario, Ontario, Canada in 1838, but I have not been able to trace his roots or immigration yet. US Census records indicate he was born in 1799 and Johan Nikel Dienst is the only Dienst I have found born in 1799.

                  • Re: Seeking records of immigration to Canada
                    Sabine Gorgas Wayfarer

                    Hi Chuck,

                     

                    on ancestry is to find

                    Johann Nickel Dienst, *18 Jan 1799, baptised 20 Jan 1799 in Spesbach, Bayern, Germany

                    Father: Peter Dienst

                    Mother: Margreth Lorenz

                    FHL Film Number 193177

                     

                    Maybe this is the Johann Nickel you are looking for although you have Prussia, which is actually a hint like trying to find a needle in a haystack. The name Nickel is not very common. Maybe he and Barbara came from the same town? Since she had already two boys when they married, do you know whether Unsicker is her maiden name? Maybe it is a chance to get access to the film and try to see what happend to this Johann and maybe there is also the name Unsicker around?

                     

                    This is a page with links for German Emigration

                    http://genwiki.genealogy.net/Auswanderung/Linkliste

                     

                    Sabine

                    1 person found this helpful
                      • Re: Seeking records of immigration to Canada
                        Chuck Murray Newbie

                        Sabine,

                        The Johann Nikel Dienst from Spesbach is the one I have in my family tree on Ancestry and Family Search. I found his birth record on Ancestry and the date is the closest to the dates I am looking for. I have not been able to verify that he is actually my ancestor however because I have not found any immigration records linking him to the US or Canada. People often changed their names when they came to the US or Canada and Nicholas is a logical change from Nikel.

                         

                        Barbara Unsicker is also from Germany, but I have not been able to locate her birth town. She arrived in Portsmouth, Virginia with her brother both using the surname Unsicker, so I think that Unsicker is her maiden name although the spelling may have been different in German. She had two sons Lewis and Daniel prior to marrying Nicholas Dienst and both are shown to be born in Canada on several US census records. Both were raised with the Dienst surname and I have not found any formal adoption records or name change records. That is not unusual for that time period however.

                         

                        Thanks for providing the link to the German data. I will check it out and see if there is any additional information about Nicholas or Barbara. Thanks very much for taking time to look into my request. It is very much appreciated, and I welcome any other suggestions or guidance you can provide.

                          • Re: Seeking records of immigration to Canada
                            Sabine Gorgas Wayfarer

                            Hi Chuck,

                            what I actually meant was to go maybe through the film with the parish register from Spesbach. The film is unfortunately not online available, but when the libraries open again it should be available in the Mormon Family History Centers.

                            All you can see now in ancestry  is the indexed information, which can be incorrect. Going over the pictures of the original parish registers It also gives you the chance to see the writing by yourself. You can check the name and and maybe other family members (godparents), who maybe emigrated too. Sometimes German parish registers contain general information of the villages or towns or information to special events that happened.

                             

                            The name Nickel could also be Nikolaus, which was in those days the most common variant of the name in German. And for Nikolaus Dienst there are several other listings for 1799 born in Prussia on ancestry or familysearch.

                             

                            Another chance could be a DNA test, f.e. with ancestry. Germans are still very reluctant with the test, but maybe it is worth a try and you can locate a match in the old world.

                             

                            Sabine

                              • Re: Seeking records of immigration to Canada
                                Susannah Brooks Scout

                                This is the baptismal entry from the Evangelische Church book 1780-1815 for Spesbach.  The records are on Archion.de (a paid site of Protestant church books from Germany).  The name is actually Johann Nickel Deinst.

                                1 person found this helpful
                                  • Re: Seeking records of immigration to Canada
                                    Chuck Murray Newbie

                                    Susannah,

                                    Thanks VERY much for providing a picture of the baptism record for Johann Nikel Dienst. I am not at all sure that this Dienst is my ancestor, but his baptism date is the closest I found so far to the dates indicated in the US Census records for my ancestor's birth. What would really be most helpful is finding some immigration records with the Dienst name on them arriving in the US or Canada in the early 1800's. I have had very little success finding anything like that so far.

                                  • Re: Seeking records of immigration to Canada
                                    Chuck Murray Newbie

                                    Sabine,

                                    Thanks for staying with this search and your continuing recommendations. I will look at the other Nikolaus Dienst's on Ancestry and Family Search. When the Family Research Center in my area reopens, I will go there to see what else I can learn.

                                     

                                    I did a DNA test with Ancestry and a Y-DNA test with Family Tree. So far neither has been much help in finding a relative with a link to the Dienst's, but as the data bases grow, I am hopeful that a link will turn up.

                          • Re: Seeking records of immigration to Canada
                            Cara Jensen Scout

                            Dear Mr. Murray,

                             

                            Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

                             

                            For the immigration information you seek, we suggest you contact the Library and Archives of Canada, 395 Wellington Street, Ottawa, ON  K1A 0N4, Canada. 

                             

                            A large number of immigrants came to the United States via Canada during the mid- and late nineteenth century, and for them there is no U.S. immigration record. They landed in Canada where no U.S. officer met them or recorded information about their arrival in the United States.

                             

                            A resource that may contain your ancestor’s birth information may be their naturalization documents.  Prior to September 27, 1906, any "court of record" (municipal, county, state, or Federal) could grant United States citizenship. Often petitioners went to the court most geographically convenient for them. As a general rule, the National Archives does not have naturalization records created in state or local courts. However, a few indexes and records have been donated to the National Archives from counties, states, and local courts. We suggest that you contact the National Archives at Chicago (RM-CH) via email at chicago.archives@nara.gov to determine if records from lower courts are available.

                             

                            Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and pursuant to guidance received from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), NARA has adjusted its normal operations to balance the need of completing its mission-critical work while also adhering to the recommended social distancing for the safety of NARA staff. As a result of this re-prioritization of activities, you may experience a delay in receiving an initial acknowledgement as well as a substantive response to your reference request from RM-CH. We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience.

                             

                            You also may wish to search the FamilySearch index for Ohio, County Naturalization Records, 1800-1977 and contact the Ohio History Connection Archives & Library to inquire about available naturalization records.   Since early naturalization records were grouped and held by the County Probate Court, you may wish to browse the FamilySearch index for Wood County Probate records for the 1840s timeframe.   We also suggest that you review the FamilySearch Research wiki for Ohio Naturalization and Citizenship.

                             

                            We hope this is helpful. Best of luck with your family research!

                             

                            1 person found this helpful