3 Replies Latest reply on Sep 12, 2020 11:15 AM by Henry Rosenberg

    long s

    Ann Thiel Newbie

      I am new to this project, so I apologize if I am out of place. However, I was encouraged Henry Rosenberg to post any tips I may have.

       

      It may be helpful to provide a link to an example of the long s (in addition to the explanation of it) in the "How to Transcribe" instructions. I just reviewed a document that contained a few words using the long s, and the original transcriber did not know what it was. I recognized it from my previous Anti-slavery Manuscript transcription work. I obtained this from Wikipedia:

        • Re: long s
          Samantha Schireson Wayfarer

          Hello!

           

          Thank you for sharing this, we appreciate any and all tips! For future reference, we do have a section on the "How to Transcribe" page called "Spelling, grammar, punctuation, word order, long s, page numbers" (middle of the page!).

           

          All the best,

          Sam

          • Re: long s
            Henry Rosenberg Tracker

            Good tip Ann. I find many people miss (no pun intended) the long s and what you posted is a good example. If you are transcribing handwritten documents from the early to late 1800's, be on the lookout for the long s. Also, for people who aren't sure what it means, the long s was used when a writer was writing double ss's in a word so that example would translate to Miss Austin's.

             

            Thanks for posting,

            Henry

            P.S., I am a volunteer transcriber. I did not want to mislead you into thinking I was a moderator and would not want to step on their toes.

            1 person found this helpful
            • Re: long s
              Henry Rosenberg Tracker

              Just thought of another tip. When you are not sure of a vowel, check to see if there is a dot over the word indicating an "i". Also, check through the page to see if they always cross their "t's". That may differentiate between an "l" and "t".

               

              If I think of others, I will post them.

              Henry