2 Replies Latest reply on Aug 18, 2020 10:59 AM by Jason Atkinson

    Seeking deck logs of USS Franklin

    Michael Quinn Newbie

      Hello, My father was a Marine during WWII in the Pacific from 1943-1945 . He mentioned coming home on the USS Franklin with fellow Marines from Okinawa. She limped back home at 30 degrees surviving once again! I am looking for information on that voyage home as I am trying to do rebuild his service history and his time spent in Pacific Theater . Any help would be appreciated! Thank you so much.

        • Re: Seeking deck logs of USS Franklin
          Alex Daverede Adventurer

          Michael,

           

          I’m afraid the ship that brought your father back from Okinawa could not have been USS Franklin (CV-13).  The attack that took the carrier out of the war took place on 19 March 1945, several days prior to the 1 April U. S. landings on Okinawa.  The ship was well on its way home by then, arriving in New York by 28 April.

           

          It’s very possible that your father came back to the U. S. on another carrier.  The following carriers: USS Saratoga (CV-3), USS Enterprise (CV-6), USS Yorktown (CV-10), USS Hornet (CV-12), USS Ticonderoga (CV-14), USS Hancock (CV-19), USS Independence (CVL-22), USS Belleau Wood (CVL-24), and USS San Jacinto (CVL-30) all performed what was known as “Magic Carpet” cruises that brought home U. S. military personnel from the far flung Pacific battlefields.

           

          I hope you find this information useful.

           

          A. J.

          • Re: Seeking deck logs of USS Franklin
            Jason Atkinson Pioneer

            Dear Mr. Quinn,

             

            Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

             

            We searched the National Archives Catalog and located the Logbooks of U.S. Navy Ships and Stations, 1941 - 1983 in the Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel (Record Group 24) that include the deck logs of the USS Franklin (CV-13) from its commissioning on 31 January 1944 through 17 February 1947. We also located World War II Action and Operational Reports in the Records of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (Record Group 38) that may include reports submitted by the USS Franklin. For more information, please contact the National Archives at College Park - Textual Reference (RDT2) via email at archives2reference@nara.gov.

             

            Plus, we located World War II War Diaries, Other Operational Records and Histories, ca. 1/1/1942 - ca. 6/1/1946 in the Records of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (Record Group 38) that contains war diaries and reports concerning the USS Franklin’s activities during World War II. These records have been digitized and can be viewed online using the Catalog.  Please keep in mind that the Catalog does not always list files in chronological order.

             

            In addition, we located  Moving Images Relating to Military Activities, ca. 1947 - 1980 in the  General Records of the Department of the Navy (Record Group 428) that includes 30 films relating to the USS Franklin. Fourteen of these films have been digitized and may be viewed online using the Catalog, but the remainder have not been digitized yet. Next, we located Audio Recordings of Radio Broadcasts of Speeches, Interviews, Combat Reports, Special Events, Public Affairs, and Entertainment for U.S. Troops, 1932 - ca. 1952 in the David Goldin Collection (Collection G) that includes 2 audio recordings concerning the USS Franklin that have not been digitized. For more information about the remaining non-digitized films and audio recordings, please contact the National Archives at College Park - Motion Pictures (RDSM) via email at mopix@nara.gov.

             

            Photographs of various U.S. Army, Navy, and Marine Corps activities dating from 1940 to 2007 are in the custody of the National Archives at College Park - Still Picture (RDSS). Please contact RDSS via email at stillpix@nara.gov to request a search for photographs of specific ships.

             

            In reference to your broader research goal of rebuilding his service history, if you have not done so already, we suggest that you request a copy of his Official Military Personnel File (OMPF). OMPFs and medical records of officers and enlisted personnel of the U.S. Marine Corps who were separated from service after 1904 and prior to 1958 are located at NARA's National Personnel Records Center (NPRC), (Military Personnel Records), 1 Archives Drive, St. Louis, MO  63138-1002.  To request these records, please mail a completed GSA Standard Form 180 to NPRC.  Be sure to specify that you want the entire file for genealogical purposes. Veterans and their next of kin also may use eVetRecs to request records. See eVetRecs Help for instructions. For more information see Official Military Personnel Files (OMPF), Archival Records Requests

             

            Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and pursuant to guidance received from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), NARA has adjusted its normal operations to balance the need of completing its mission-critical work while also adhering to the recommended social distancing for the safety of NARA staff. As a result of this re-prioritization of activities, you may experience a delay in receiving an initial acknowledgement as well as a substantive response to your reference request from RDT2, RDSM, and RDSS. Also, the NPRC staff currently are only servicing emergency requests and will soon expand its service to include time-sensitive requests from veterans for records needed to secure VA home loan guarantees and employment opportunities. We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience.

             

            We searched the website of the Naval History and Heritage Command and located an article about Franklin III (CV-13) as well as multiple photographs.

             

            Finally, the unofficial website NavSource has a page on the USS Franklin.

             

            We hope this is helpful. Best of luck with your family research!