1 Reply Latest reply on Jul 30, 2020 9:47 AM by LOC Manuscript Division

    Seeking Lincoln’s Ideas on integrating freed slaves into Confederate states

    Raphael Richman Newbie

      Are there any published examples of how Lincoln was thinking about integrating soon to be newly freed slaves into hostile white states as Civil War victory looked near at hand in March 1865? Did he embrace General Sherman’s idea of “40 acres and a mule”? Did he come up with it himself? Are there records of him consulting with his close aides about this?

        • Re: Seeking Lincoln’s Ideas on integrating freed slaves into Confederate states
          LOC Manuscript Division Tracker

          Dear Ms. Richman,

           

          Thank you for posting to History Hub regarding your research on Lincoln and his thoughts on integrating soon to be newly freed slaves. The Abraham Lincoln Papers in the custody of the Library of Congress, Manuscript Division contains approximately 40,550 documents dating from 1774 to 1948, although most of the collection spans from the 1850s through Lincoln’s presidency (1861-1865).  Roughly half of the collection, more than 20,000 documents, comprising 62,000 images, as well as transcriptions of approximately 10,000 documents, is online at https://www.loc.gov/collections/abraham-lincoln-papers/about-this-collection/.

           

          To search for relevant material in the online collection, you may conduct a keyword search for names of Lincoln aides and associates he may have confided in or for the states you are interested in. You may also browse correspondence in Series 1 and 2 chronologically by selecting the links from the digital collection home page or from the Container List in the finding aid (PDF). The Related Resources page also includes an extensive bibliography of published sources that may be useful to your search.

           

          If you have any specific questions about how to navigate the online Lincoln Papers, please do not hesitate to contact Manuscript Division staff through the Ask a Librarian service.