6 Replies Latest reply on Oct 15, 2020 10:35 AM by kim Rush

    Seeking explanation of Court Docket

    kim Rush Newbie

      I could use some help interpreting a 1880 US District Court for the Third Judicial District, Wyoming Territory (W.T.) docket. Is this for a Naturalization? I am not sure if it is an application for citizenship or a complaint made against someone who obtained citizenship by providing false information. The entry I'm interested in is on line 12 of the attached document. The Plaintiff was Pinchon and Griswold and the Defendant was Joshua Highwarden No. 2583, dated  December 29, 1880  Any information will be deeply appreciated. 

      1880 Naturalization document

        • Re: Seeking explanation of Court Docket
          Alice Lane Tracker

          Hi Kim,

          Welcome to History Hub

          I found the following on Newspapers.com, seems that Pinchon & Griswold were Architects in 1880. also found another item which you had already clipped.

          The Seattle Post-Intelligencer

          Seattle, Washington

          Wednesday, December 01, 1880 - Page 1

           

           

          Also there was mention in one item on Ancestry that Dr. Highwarden had a home built around 1880.

          Best Wishes

          Alice Lane, Research Volunteer.

           

           

           

           

           

           

          1 person found this helpful
            • Re: Seeking explanation of Court Docket
              kim Rush Newbie

              Thank you so much for helping me try to make sense of this issue. I have been studying Joshua Highwarden for over a year and have found an almost stunning amount of information about him. In 1880, he was at Seattle working as a physician and surgeon in the Arcade building there, building a home nearby, and he married a lady from Coupeville in November of that same year. Recently I have discovered that most of the court cases against him are for unpaid debts. I'm quite certain that the ad you found for Pinchon and Griswold is relevant, and I'm quite sure that Pinchon was Highwarden's landlord in 1880 and 1881. Highwarden may have owed him money.

                • Re: Seeking explanation of Court Docket
                  kim Rush Newbie

                  I received a digital copy of this court record (Pinchon and Griswold (plaintiffs) vs. Joshua Highwarden (defendent) from the Puget Sound Regional Archive this week.  Essentially, according to pleas rendered by the the plaintiffs, Joshua Highwarden hired Pinchon and Griswold to create plans to build a home for Highwarden in Seattle. Highwarden is accused of not honoring this agreement, causing financial distress for the plaintiffs. During this same year (1880) Highwarden's wife passed away in May of 1880. At that time Highwarden was renting or leasing office and residence space from Griswold and Pinchon at the new Arcade building in Seattle. This arrangement continued as late as July of 1881. On November 10, 1880, Highwarden married a widow who owned a home on Whidbey Island near Seattle.  Possibly, Highwarden backed away from his agreement with the Plaintiffs because he was planning on moving to Whidbey Island, which he eventually did. 

              • Re: Seeking explanation of Court Docket
                Joseph Armstrong Wayfarer

                Hi Kim,

                 

                Thank you for posting to the History Hub. This represents a Civil Docket. The Plaintiff is bringing a Law Suit against the Defendant for a non-criminal matter. The Judgement is for either the Plaintiff or Defendant and usually involves money, court cost or some action that is warranted..

                 

                Joe

                1 person found this helpful
                  • Re: Seeking explanation of Court Docket
                    kim Rush Newbie

                    Thank you, Joseph.. You are right on target.  I have discovered that the cases located in this document which pertain to Joshua Highwarden all relate to unpaid debts.

                    Thank you so much for helping me try to make sense of this issue. I have been studying Joshua Highwarden for over a year and have found an almost stunning amount of information about him. In 1880, he was at Seattle working  (and residing) as a physician and surgeon in the Arcade building there, building a home nearby, and he married a lady from Coupeville in November of that same year. Recently I have discovered that most of the court cases against him are for unpaid debts. I'm quite certain that the ad you found for Pinchon and Griswold is relevant, and I'm quite sure that Pinchon was Highwarden's landlord in 1880 and 1881. Highwarden may have owed him money.