3 Replies Latest reply on Jul 15, 2019 5:24 PM by Victoria Van Hyning

    Question about words added by someone else to a document.

    Sharon McKinley Adventurer

      OK, so I don't always know the right place to look for an answer.

       

      Perhaps I shouldn't always wanna try out the next new campaign....here I am reviewing in Eliz. Cady Stanton's speeches, and there's this speech about co-ed education, written by Stanton and given by Susan B. Anthony.

      https://crowd.loc.gov/campaigns/susan-b-anthony-papers/anthony-speeches-and-other-writings/mss11049042/mss11049042-3/ There are several places where someone has added comments in brackets (uh-oh!), or have made little editorial comments (e.g. "[Begin]") or Has been copied, which the transcriber put in brackets. That's confusing, of course, but I'm not sure how else to denote that something has been inserted by someone else. Then there are what appear to be cross-outs within a statement that starts as marginalia, so it gets [*blahblah*]. and near the bottom of the next page https://crowd.loc.gov/campaigns/susan-b-anthony-papers/anthony-speeches-and-other-writings/mss11049042/mss11049042-4/

      there's the note "Begin." not marginalia, just extraneous. How to notate this?

       

      Thanks,

      Sharon M.

        • Re: Question about words added by someone else to a document.
          Victoria Van Hyning Scout

          Hi Sharon,

           

          This is a good question. Words added by someone else are an example of marginalia, so I would put them in square brackets and asterisks [*Begin*]. I think our current instructions could be tweaked to more clearly accommodate cases like this one. Thanks for bringing it to our attention.

           

          -Victoria

            • Re: Question about words added by someone else to a document.
              Henry Rosenberg Scout

              When I have seen things like the paragraph symbol, I have ignored it and just transcribed the text. Not sure if that was correct but I made an "editorial" decision. Victoria- would it be possible for the transcriber to follow the instruction of "Begin" if it means place this at the beginning? Just asking. I haven't come across that but I have been doing more in Mary Church Terrell and probably haven't had enough exposure. BTW, my wife and I are in Rochester NY. Have been to Susan B. Anthony house and headed for Seneca Falls Friday for Elizabeth Cady Stanton and "Convention Days". These transcriptions really personalize the experience.

               

              Fun stuff.

               

              Henry

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                • Re: Question about words added by someone else to a document.
                  Victoria Van Hyning Scout

                  Hi Henry,

                   

                  We haven't offered guidance before about the paragraph symbol, but my advice would be to ignore it. In this case, It's best to transcribe the piece as it appears, following the original layout of the document. It's an interpretive or editorial step to then decide how best to lay the speech out for reading it. By the People broadly tries to avoid asking volunteers to make editorial decisions, because there are so many possible ways to go about it. We think best to copy the text as closely to how it appears on the original document, and that people make their own interpretations. For example, there's a school of editing called "Diplomatic" which absolutely follows the layout of the original document and very meticulously reproduces every detail of the original, while some editors, particularly those who are interested in the event--the speech as it was mostly likely heard by other people--would probably reorder the prose. Hope that helps!

                   

                  -Victoria

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