1 Reply Latest reply on Apr 2, 2019 1:59 PM by Rebecca Collier

    Missing Enumeration District in the 1920 Census

    amaziah Newbie

      I believe there is an enumeration district that was missed in the 1920 census that contains a few of my ancestors and their peers. I am concerned about the Township of Kennady in Le Flore County, Oklahoma. The enumeration district for Kennady Township was 0017 and 40-19 in 1930 and 1940, respectively.

      I'm not sure what the best source is for enumeration district descriptions, but per Ancestry here they are:

      enter image description here

      The following link provides the 1930 Enumeration District Map for Kennady Township (I could not find the 1920 equivalent):

      enter image description here

      https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89HB-GF9Z?i=462&wc=92VW-W38%3A1077260901&cc=2329948

      Note the irregular shape of the township, with the actual town in the southeast corner. A topographical map reveals that a large hill cuts through the township: enter image description here

      I have outlined some of the relevant landmarks/boundaries as best as possible. The regions above and below the yellow line represent township 7 and 6, respectively. The regions east and west of the blue line represents range 24 E and 23 E, respectively.

      Cross-referencing the ED descriptions and the 1930s ED map, it appears that T 7 N, R 23 E is missing, along with a considerable proportion of the Kennady Township's population. I have searched the border townships/counties' enumeration district descriptions (again on Ancestry) and could not find T 7 N, R 23 E.

      My questions are (in order of importance):

      1. Can anyone confirm this ED was overlooked?
      2. Is there a chance that this region was covered and somehow Ancestry/FamilySearch missed the images, meaning the records still exist?
      3. Is there a comprehensive list of ED description that I can better search for T 7 N, R 23?
      4. Does an equivalent ED map exist for 1920? If not, then why?

      This is a brick wall that has plagued my research for nearly a decade. I truly appreciate any insight or ideas on how I should approach this.