4 Replies Latest reply on Mar 15, 2019 4:02 PM by Sharon McKinley

    Random pages offered by the system for review

    Sharon McKinley Wayfarer

      Hi, folks!

      So...I say yes, give me a page to review, and find it's in the middle of a letter, and the pages around it have been reviewed already! Does this mean that if you finish a page and say "gimme another, please!" you get a random page assigned, instead of the next page needing review?  I'd much prefer to review an entire letter than a miscellaneous page. Is there any way to have this happen? I get it that the system may not be able to tell which documents belong together in a single narrative....

       

      Thanks,

      Sharon

        • Re: Random pages offered by the system for review
          Henry Rosenberg Adventurer

          Sometimes, I am transcribing and reviewing and when I stop it may be in the middle of a letter. I tend to go in order but I find that others pick and choose what they want to review. When I go to a section I haven't done in order, I find that people will skip the handwritten pages(which I prefer). I feel that your experience may be that someone started transcribing and decided they didn't want to continue. Usually documents that are together are consecutive. I have transcribed 5 page letters and they are always consecutive. Sometimes they are backwards though.

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          • Re: Random pages offered by the system for review
            suzanne piecuch Adventurer

            Hi Sharon,

             

            I've had that experience, too, but I've noticed that if I happen upon a virgin transcription, the "next page" feature will take me to the next page in the set: Same with reviewing.

             

            Henry's right about the random nature of pages, and certainly transcribers have been encouraged to move on from pages they feel they can't handle, so there's a lot of that.

             

            I don't mind getting on mid-stream because sometimes I'm strapped for time, and also it gives me the tools (familiarity with writer's style) to perhaps review a couple of the pages and make edits.

             

            (I confess I just left a multi-page document because I'm doing this on my lunch break and ran out of time!! Hoping to catch up with it later!)

             

            Suzanne.

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            • Re: Random pages offered by the system for review
              Lauren Algee Adventurer

              Henry has hit the nail on the head!  The code behind the buttons that take you to a new page is written so that it will take you to the next page in the existing linear order of the collection (as it is arranged in folders and boxes on the Library's Shelves) that fits the following criteria:

               

              1. Allows you to do the activity you've chosen (this is based on item status - you'll only be taken to "Not Started' if you're transcribing or "Needs Review" if you're reviewing)

              2. Doesn't have another user working on it

              3.  You are able to work on it (for example, if you're reviewing you won't be taken to something you submitted)

               

              So you are taken to the next chronological page if it meets all the criteria above, but that isn't always the case because sometimes users skip around, or because a page will need more rounds of review than others around it.

               

              Sharon, it's an interesting thought that we might allow logged in users to decide that they only want to go to the first page of items where all pages are "not started".  Something we can consider for future development.

               

              suzanne piecuch, I like your perspective on this!  Just as we advise new users that review can actually be an easier place to start that review, transcribing a page where the others around it have already been transcribed can help you to interpret trickier words.  I also like the feeling of finishing something, even if someone else started it. It's like getting to place the last piece of a puzzle!