2 Replies Latest reply on Dec 19, 2018 2:27 PM by Rebecca Collier

    WWII US Army 11th Replacement Depot

    Michael Ruffus Newbie

      I am looking for any records for this unit to which my dad belonged in WWII.  I know he was in Limavady Northern Ireland UK, several places in England before D-Day and got as far as Bonn Germany.  He subsequently was sent to the pacific theater and made it all the way to Japan

        • Re: WWII US Army 11th Replacement Depot
          Holly Rivet Adventurer

          Hello Mr. Ruffus,

           

          Thank you for posting your question to the History Hub!

           

          You may be able to request his Army Official Military Personnel Files (OMPF) from the National Archives in St. Louis depending on when he was discharged from service.  These records are releasable to the public when the date of separation becomes 62 years from today’s date. To access these records, please submit a completed Request Pertaining to Military Records form to the following address for access to this record.

           

          National Archives and Records Administration

          National Archives at St. Louis

          ATTN: RL-SL

          PO Box 38757
          St. Louis, MO 63138.

           

          Since he served in the Army, there is a chance his record was damaged in the 1973 Fire. If this is the case, then you may research the Morninghttps://catalog.archives.gov/id/85713825Reports, ca. 1912 - 1946. These reports are daily logs detailing unit strength, movement, and members as they join, leave, or become ill or injured.  To search these, you will need to determine where he was at a specific point in his service.  The most common way is to use their date and place of discharge.  From that point, we can go backward in time to see when that member joined and where they came from. 

           

          Researchers must specify the organizational unit and date. NARA staff can then use an index to locate the microfilm reel or paper report for the given unit on a particular date.  Upon request, we will provide digitized images on DVD of organizational records, each taken from a roll of microfilm created by the Department of the Air Force in the 1950s and 1960s.  The original paper documents no longer exist. The response time for future requests may be six or more months, depending upon our available resources and the total volume of requests received.

           

          If you would like to personally view the rosters or morning reports, we will make them available, by appointment only, in our Archival Research Room located at the National Personnel Records Center, Archival Research Room, 1 Archives Drive, St. Louis, MO  63138. For a small fee, you may print copies of the pages you want from the microfilm. To schedule an appointment, please contact the Archival Research Room in advance, by phone at (314) 801-0850 or by email at stlarr.archives@nara.gov.

           

          We hope this information has been helpful!

           

          Sincerely,

          Holly Rivet

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          • Re: WWII US Army 11th Replacement Depot
            Rebecca Collier Pioneer

            Dear Mr. Rufus,

             

            Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

             

            Most of the time, replacement units were the last unit a soldier was assigned to before he was mustered out at the end of the war. To double-check what unit he was with please check his OMPF and morning reports as stated in Holly Rivet’s response.

             

            If he was indeed part of the 11th Replacement Depot during the war, we do have various histories and general orders of the 11th from 1943-1946 in the World War II Operations Reports, 1940 - 1948 which are part of the Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1905-1981 (Record Group 407). For access to or copies of these records, please contact the National Archives at College Park - Textual Reference (RDT2) via email at archives2reference@nara.gov.

             

            We hope this information is helpful. Best of luck with your research! 

             

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