1 Reply Latest reply on Sep 11, 2018 4:43 PM by Katharine Seitz

    Log book for for 1868 for Fort Fred Steele (Wyoming) U.S. 30th Infantry

    Paul Rands Newbie

      Did 19th century U.S. military outposts keep daily action reports or log books? If so, how can I research them? I'm looking for activity for the summer of 1868 for Fort Fred Steele which was located on the west bank of the North Platte River just north of where the Union Pacific trestle (bridge). Apparently, the fort was manned by the U.S. 30th Infantry.

        • Re: Log book for for 1868 for Fort Fred Steele (Wyoming) U.S. 30th Infantry
          Katharine Seitz Adventurer

          Dear Mr. Rands,

           

          Thank you for contacting the History Hub with your query.

           

          The records you are looking for do not exist in the form you described. While there are several related records, no single logbook exists which contains daily information about the 30th Infantry. However, there are associated records from which you may be able to get information about the activities of Summer 1868.

           

          Ancestry.com, which is free to use on NARA computers, has digitized two NARA microfilm series that have content dealing with the 30th Infantry: M617 U.S. Returns from Military Posts, 1806-1916 and M665 U.S. Returns from Regular Army Infantry Regiments, 1821-1916. Your local library system may also have a subscription to Ancestry.com.

           

          The paper records for the 30th Infantry that seem closest to what you are looking for are in Record Group 393: Records of U.S. Army Continental Commands, 1817 - 1947 and Record Group 391: Records of United States Regular Army Mobile Units, 1821-1942. Both of these contain records pertaining to the 30th Infantry during that time period. These include letters, descriptive books, duty rosters, and one volume of morning reports for Company B, 1867-1869.

           

          As stated above, none of these is the perfect fit for your research needs, but if you are hoping to look at primary sources, they are available at the Washington, DC location of the National Archives. For more information on researching with us please visit the website, which will also help you request copies of records remotely if you wish to do so.

           

          We wish you all the best with your research.

           

          Sincerely,

           

          Katharine Seitz

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