3 Replies Latest reply on Aug 30, 2018 2:44 PM by Elliot Schneider

    Civil War Bounties

    Luci J Baker Johnson Adventurer

      I've read that a federal enlistment bounty (bonus) of $100 began in 1861; $300 for a three year term was begun in October 1863. And soon after states began adding to that, most as much as $100.

       

      The War Board in Winneshiek Co., IA, voted to pay a bounty of $50. "Towns added more, $10 to the enlistee, and a promise to give $8 a month to the soldier's wife and $4 to each child., pledging to take care of them should the soldier fail to return. Q. #1 Where would I look to locate records of these payments being made to individual soldiers?

       

      In October, 1864, to avoid have to drat men, the city of Madison, WI, began adding $200 to the enlistment bounty, and other towns soon followed. Q. #2 Where could I locate original documentation to support this statement? That is, is there a payment book that documents these payments?

        • Re: Civil War Bounties
          Jenette Parish Adventurer

          Hello Ms Baker,

           

          Thank you for contacting the History Hub regarding the Civil War. Your questions are very good and should be directed to our Army reference staff at the National Archives in Washington D.C. You may email the staff attn: Civil War Army records at archives1reference@nara.gov or visit Washington D.C. in person for a consultation.


          I hope this information is helpful. Best of luck with your research.

           

          Jenette Parish

           

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          • Re: Civil War Bounties
            Elliot Schneider Adventurer

            Hello Ms. Johnson,

             

            Just to give you a little known history behind bounties. Their were allot young men at that time that needed money. They were called bounty jumpers, they woul enlisted on the Union Army collect their bounty paid, than leave. Then they would go to the south enlisted in Confederate Army collect bounty and leave. This of course happened Visa versa. That's why sometimes you look and you see the same name on both Confederate Army enlistments and Union Army Enlistments. If they were lucky to totally get avoid jail, if not they might also end up on the Provost Marshalls Rolls being transferred to local fort prisons. This is a very interesting time period with lots of history. Hope this also aids you with additional questions.

             

             

            Thanks,

             

            Elliot Schneider

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            • Re: Civil War Bounties
              Elliot Schneider Adventurer

              Ms. Johnson,

               

               

              Question: are you looking for an individual, or just some information pertaining to bounties, and proxies. There are many state historical museums or archives depending on where the individual was born, or even enlisted. Most of these state archives generally have enlisted rolls, pension, and bounty records available. All depends on where in the country you are looking; most of the eastern states from New York to the Carolinas have wonderful state archives that document these items you are questioning or seeking.

               

               

               

              Elliot Schneider

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