3 Replies Latest reply on Jul 23, 2018 9:49 AM by Amanda Pritchard

    Records of EMIGRATION from USA 1821 - 1849

    Margaret Smyth Newbie

      I'm looking for the EMIGRATION of my gg grandmother who was born in Lincoln, Lancaster, Pennsylvania  "America (British Subject)" in about 1821 and married in England in 1849.  She raised a family here and appears in all the UK census records, probably from 1841 onwards.  I can find only immigration records into USA and would dearly love to find her in emigration records. All suggestions would be very gratefully received.

        • Re: Records of EMIGRATION from USA 1821 - 1849
          Amanda Pritchard Adventurer

          Dear Ms. Smyth,

           

          Thank you for contacting History Hub!

           

          Please clarify...Are you looking for emigration records from the U.S. to England, or from England to the U.S.? You mentioned that you located records of her immigration to the U.S. Was this from England? Did she leave the U.S. to go to England, return at some point to the U.S. and then return back to England? Approximately, what years do you think she emigrated? Somewhere between her birth in the U.S. in 1821 and the 1841 UK Census? Or sometime after?

           

            • Re: Records of EMIGRATION from USA 1821 - 1849
              Margaret Smyth Newbie
              Thank you for your interest.  I am looking for Emigration records from US to England between Sarah Stubb's birth in 1821 in the US and her marriage in England in 1849.

               

              There is an 1841 census record that could show her in London in 1841 but I'm not relying on that.

              As far as I know, she did no other travelling and the only name she is recorded under is Sarah (Stubbs then Young).

               

               

                • Re: Records of EMIGRATION from USA 1821 - 1849
                  Amanda Pritchard Adventurer

                  Dear Ms. Smyth,

                   

                  Thank you for contacting History Hub!

                   

                  Unfortunately any information we located for U.S. departures did not cover the 1840s. We believe that it was just not something that was documented regularly until well into the 20th century.

                   

                  We suggest you take a look at a collection on Ancestry (available for a fee) called “England, Alien Arrivals, 1810-1811, 1826-1869.” The collection contains lists of aliens (non-British citizens) arriving in England between 1810 and 1869 and include such information as name, port and date of arrival, ship, country of origin, profession, and certificate number. If you have any questions with the collection or need assistance, you can reach out to The National Archives in the UK.

                   

                  There is another collection on Ancestry (available for a fee) that might be worth checking out called “UK, Aliens Entry Books, 1794-1921.” The collection contains correspondence and other documents of the Home Office and the Aliens Office from 1794 to 1921 relating to aliens and naturalisations.

                   

                  The National Archives in the UK has numerous collections relating to aliens and naturalization. One of their collections which is available to view online is called “naturalisation case papers 1801-1871” which contains naturalization petitions completed by individuals applying to become British citizens between 1801 and 1871 (if your ancestor did in fact become a British citizen). They may contain information on nationality and year of arrival, among other things.

                  We suggest you reach out to The National Archives in the UK because it appears that they have several resources for naturalization, immigration and emigration, and alien entry. Some of the resources are available on Ancestry, on their website, or only in person. The resources they have may provide you with the date and location of when your ancestor came to England.

                   

                  Best of luck in your research!

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