7 Replies Latest reply on Nov 26, 2017 3:30 PM by Steve Spicer

    I'm wondering if the entry "omitted" in the registers of the Revolution have any further meaning.

    Steve Spicer Wayfarer

      I'm wondering if the entry "omitted" in the registers of the Revolution have any further meaning. I've traced the career of my ancestor in the 3rd NJ Regiment from Feb 1776 to early 1779 through muster and pay rolls. His company was taken over by a Major in March 1779 and in the List of NJ Troops he is "Omitted Jan or Feb 79". Supposedly he retired in 1780 but I've never found a discharge.
      There are a number of other men listed as "omitted."

        • Re: I'm wondering if the entry "omitted" in the registers of the Revolution have any further meaning.
          Research Services at the National Archives Scout

          Dear Mr. Spicer,

           

          Thank you for contacting History Hub about this inquiry in your research. We are unaware of any specific meaning for the wording “omitted” in the rolls, but it is an interesting point. We concur with Mr. Deiss's suggestions regarding its possible meaning, but we would also suggest that you may wish to contact the Textual Reference Branch at Archives1reference@nara.gov to determine whether they may have any other thoughts on its meaning.

           

          In general, to see what types of Revolutionary War-related collections that the National Archives maintains in its holdings, follow this link. There is also a helpful article from the National Archives publication, Prologue that can help you trace a Revolutionary War ancestor through the pension files. That article can be found here.

           

          We wish you luck in your research, and thank you again for contacting the History Hub.

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            • Re: I'm wondering if the entry "omitted" in the registers of the Revolution have any further meaning.
              Steve Spicer Wayfarer

              Thank you.

              I find the word omit on a number of pay rolls, but those are easily explained since the amount paid is more and the phrase, something like "omitted in Feb", simply means that he was left off the pay roll in the previous month.

               

              It's the register compiled between 1894-1913 (Image 74 < List of New Jersey Troops < Rosters of State and Continental Troops < Series: Numbered Record Books, 1894-1913 < RG 93) that has the word that makes me scratch my head.

               

              Image 74 Rosters.jpg

               

              Thanks again for your suggestion of who to contact.

              Steve

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                • Re: I'm wondering if the entry "omitted" in the registers of the Revolution have any further meaning.
                  Jonathan Deiss Adventurer

                  Steve Spicer

                   

                  It appears that in February 1779, after the reorganization of the Continental Line, he was ommitted because he was considered 'supernumerary' or above the number of men needed, and not 'reconnected' as stated on one of his CMSR cards.  In 1778 New Jersey's quota to the Continental Army was 4 Battalions.  That year the currency was so depreciated that officers and men were not fairly paid; and subsequently the following year, in 1779 New Jerseys quota was reduced to 3 Battalions.  Any excuse to reduce the number of officers and men was entertained, and a great number of officers in several state lines were made supernumerary, or basically regarded as unwanted.  Many of them continued to serve in state units, or militia companies, but not directly in Continental service.

                   

                  I think Mott may explain it best himself, in a statement penned by Mott and other supernumerary officers in April 1779, as found in the pension case file of Elias Longstreet (W2504) (see images below).  Clipboard.jpg

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                    • Re: I'm wondering if the entry "omitted" in the registers of the Revolution have any further meaning.
                      Steve Spicer Wayfarer

                      Jonathan,

                      Thank you so much for your help and research - it is very much appreciated. I'd seen references to the officers who were 'supernumeraries' but never really understood what it was all about. The letter certainly explains that and more.

                       

                      I realize I may have been trying to split a hair with "committed" but given that I have not found any muster or pay rolls for him for the rest of 1779 I was wondering if it had a special connotation.

                       

                      I suspect that there was another reason for his leaving. His granddaughter wrote the family legend that "He was one bitterly cold Sunday forced to defend his family (a wife and three children, one but a day old) from six marauding Hessian soldiers." (Amanda Jones, Poems, 1854-1906). Now if only one part of that is accurate - the bitterly cold day - then by the family Bible record of John Mott written from the memory of his son in the 1840s or 50s, the only one of his five children by his first wife who was born in the winter after the start of the Revolution was born January 31,1779. The Hessians may have been deserters at that point in time, but also his household was severely plundered in Mount Holly, New Jersey in 1776 and 1778. When his wife died is unknown, but he remarried within nine years of 1779.

                       

                      I'm working on a rewrite of a some 15 year old webpage ( http://spicerweb.org/Genealogy/johnmott_rev.aspx ) on him since a lot of information has been collected since then. Larry Kidder has provided an excellent article on the "other John Mott" - a Captain in the 1st Hunterdon Militia - in his article at http://davidlibraryar.blogspot.com/2011/11/patrons-perspective-tracing-new-jersey.html, and in his book A People Harassed and Exhausted.

                       

                       

                      Thank you again for all your help.

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