38 Replies Latest reply on Jun 4, 2017 2:35 PM by Michael Tomko

    Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?

    Bill Streifer Adventurer

      Around 50 years ago, U.S. Naval Intelligence created a film (which it described as a "briefing"), intended for the general public. That film is now located at NARA, but it was uploaded to YouTube in 2010.

       

      Unfortunately, the "briefing" is a complete fabrication, the facts as presented are in actually just the opposite, and a map seen in the film does not reflect what actually happened.

       

      I just noticed that the film was a fake, but others, including scholars, the U.S. Navy, and NARA, must have realized that the film was designed to misrepresent what happened, an incident which the press described as potentially a violent military confrontation.

       

      If NARA was aware that the film was produced by the Navy to publicize a deception, is NARA responsible for housing the film for 50 years and posting it on YouTube in 2010 without making any reference to the intentional errors contained within it?, 

        • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
          Onaona Guay Wayfarer

          The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is the depository of the permanently valuable non-current records of the Federal Government. Our mission is to preserve the records and make them available to the public. When this record was transferred to the legal custody of the National Archives, we may not add to, subtract from, or change in any way the contents of official records of the U.S. government. If you have found an error in a record produced by an agency of the U.S. government, we suggest that you contact that agency to correct their official records.

          4 of 5 people found this helpful
            • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
              Bill Streifer Adventurer

              I'm not looking to change the "official record." I'm looking to change NARA's "scope and content" to reflect the disinformation.

              1 of 1 people found this helpful
                • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                  Ann Abney Scout

                  Mr. Streifer -

                   

                  As another archivist at NARA put it, "We don't interpret records, we just provide access." It is the job of the researcher to interpret the records to determine if they are false, misleading, or accurate. The Scope and Content note's job is to explain the type of records and the content such as subjects, people, places, and things.

                   

                  By all means, as a researcher, you have every right to set the record straight with your writing. However, as the preserver of our nation's heritage we will continue to provide access and descriptions of the records for the good, the bad, the ugly, and the incorrect without correction or interpretation.

                  3 of 3 people found this helpful
                    • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                      Bill Streifer Adventurer

                      I think there's a difference between some obscure captured Japanese document in which Japan (erroneously) claims they are close to victory during WWII and an official U.S. Navy intelligence report, intended for an international committee -- in which the Navy intentionally and erroneously misrepresented their mission to North Korea in 1968.

                       

                      At some point, NARA should add the words "alleged" or "erroneously." Because by not adding those sort of words, it suggests that NARA is condoning the statement or has nothing to contradict that statement, when in fact it does, elsewhere in their archive. Also at some point, you might considered characterizing that "documentary" as propaganda to avoid WWIII. When it was posted to YouTube in 2012, it was described as an "educational documentary," when in fact it's just the opposite.

                       

                      Yesterday, when I informed a college sophomore, a journalism student, she said, "OMG. They're going to have to re-write every history book."

                  • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                    Bill Streifer Adventurer

                    You wrote:

                    The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is the depository of the permanently valuable non-current records of the Federal Government. Our mission is to preserve the records and make them available to the public. When this record was transferred to the legal custody of the National Archives, we may not add to, subtract from, or change in any way the contents of official records of the U.S. government. If you have found an error in a record produced by an agency of the U.S. government, we suggest that you contact that agency to correct their official records.

                     

                    Speaking from experience, it's not that simple. I've since contacted the "agency" for additional information to help set the record straight. That agency was the Navy, specifically the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC). When I asked them for every document on the subject, they came back with nothing: NO RECORDS FOUND.

                     

                    But I didn't give up. So I contacted NARA, and an angel answered my prayers (it just happens to be Christmas time). She said she found 180 boxes of records in possible response to my request. unfortunately, they're all classified. Then I asked her how I could get all of those documents declassified and obtain a fee waiver... for some 180,000 pages of documents that NHHC had already told me none exist.

                     

                    That would explain why a member of the crew, an officer, refused to answer my questions, and why that briefing in 1946 was filled with lies -- because the TRUE STORY remains buried in 180 boxes of classified documents at NARA. So in this case, NARA is a lot more than a holder of Federal Government "records"; it's also the holder of Federal agency lies as well as top-secret records that contain the truth,

                     

                    Stay tuned!

                      • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                        Michael Tomko Adventurer

                        War involves deception and political posturing.  I have been researching events which occurred during Desert Storm, and began requesting information almost 1 year ago.  Each agency and even  NARA uses a quick electronic search engine. But in many cases the records are textual and in a PDF format that cannot be accessed by an optical search engine.  Their are also instances of "off line " records that have not been down loaded into the cloud, or they are retained in another country as to minimize a FOIA or MDR, Mandatory Declassification Review. Many individuals are unaware how to search for the information and request the SF135 Transmittal and Receipt records. Many records are at the WNRC, Washington National Records Center, and controlled by the individual agencies. In many cases these records are not able to be electronically searched.  A request to the agency, specifically asking for SF135 records retained at the WNRC would need to be included in a FOIA or MDR.  Even a Congressional Request, involving your local congress person may result in a " Records Not Found" response.  The USS Pueblo incident most likely has SF135's that would show documents sill held by the WNRC, and controlled by the Navy or DIA. The truth is out there.

                        It's a long path, but history should contain elements of the truth....

                          • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                            Bill Streifer Adventurer

                            So you know, the USS Pueblo was on a joint "secret" NSA/Naval mission. So whether you are dealing with the Pueblo Incident or Desert Storm, if the truth has since come out, NARA's records should contain a disclaimer. Otherwise, truths and lies are given the same weight, which is wrong.in my opinion

                             

                            Here's a silly example:

                             

                            Currently, there's a TV movie series about a world in which the Axis Power,won WWII. It's entirely fiction and everyone knows it. But in 100 years, if that TV series is archived at NARA, should NARA say, "This collection is fiction"? I think so. And they should do the same with propaganda, as with that 1968 Navy briefing on the Pueblo Incident. If it was Nazi propaganda, would NARA say nothing?..

                              • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                I understand.  But that would have to be legislatively written into NARA's mission and they would be given legal authority by Congress and the Senate.  The naval officer may have signed a Confidentiality Agreement whereby a violation would have led to fines or imprisonment.  Or perhaps he was receiving military retirement. Or just afraid to speak of the event due to potential repercussions.  There could also be NSA documents that are still controlled at the WNRC concerning the mission.  In some cases a joint mission could have pieces at each agencies jurisdiction.  There are also elements that are compartmentalized.  Such as, the US Pueblo would not have been aware of any undersea warfare operations or submarine patrols within the sector. The Pueblo was most likely only one aspect of a  surface warfare intel mission. The capture of the Pueblo was during a time when North Korea was escalating tensions during the Vietnam War.  The public and international opinion was crucial.  The US was also concerned with the possibility of two major wars in South East Asia.  I have not worked at NARA, but I have worked at a few agencies, and each has it's own culture, values and mission.  Perhaps a NARA branch involving historic information integrity could be proposed by law?

                                  • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                    Bill Streifer Adventurer

                                    I actually contacted two participants. One was an officer on the Pueblo and one was the Naval Intelligence officer who gave that bogus briefing. You might be right about why the crewman refused to answer, but I think I know why the Naval officer DID respond but continued to lie. He may be unaware that the documents that prove he's lying were recently declassified. In light of these recently-declassified documents, his comments just look kind of silly. Can you imagine if Neil Armstrong told CNN he never actually walked on the moon? Then when the CNN reporter pointed out that the video was released, Armstrong said, "They were? I didn't know that!"

                                      • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                        Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                        Intel and events at the lower levels is kept in a bubble. The Pueblo may not have even known a US Sub was in their vicinity, or that a US Plane was monitoring them.  Most likely being used as a decoy for another mission going on. This is what happens with Army ground units routinely. The operation will only be known at the Corps or Command Staff level.  Line Divisions and Battalion level Intel sections would have no idea. And radio communications would have been on a separate frequency, whereby the Pueblo would have been out of the loop.  Desert Storm National Guard and Reserve Army Units,  have After Action Reports that cannot be found even on the SF135 Descriptions.  They did  exist at the Battalion and Detachment Levels.  Reports of Survey involving fatal accidents are also lost in the maze.

                                        There are ethical officers that attempted to declassify the events, which resulted in the admission of the demolition of chemical weapons and the Sarin Plume, but there are still inconsistencies with missing log pages and logs that change format. There is even documentation and memos in the SF135  that NARA staff became ill while inspecting the documents. And NARA had the documents chemical analyzed. And placed chemical paper in the folders to detect Phosgene. There' s no mention of bacterial testing and cultures for Q-Fever or Brucellosis spores, which are common in goats and camels, and highly infectious.  And often weaponized and involved in veterinary outbreaks and carried airborne  for miles. A VA Clinician told me that a Desert Storm veteran began to have memory problems, and was brought by his wife,  whereby he had a high chronic coxiella Q-Fever Titer, whereby he began 2 years of antibiotic treatment.  I have just recently found the Joint Operations Center Daily Executive Summaries, Significant Event Log, Warbook, and EAP Emergency Action Plan Manual prepared by the JOC for Gen Schwarzkopf.  And noticed a numerical pattern in actual military Series Description Number of J-3 Series 11,  and a POSSIBLE NARA HMS Entry Number , which is Not found in their public search engine.  Add 12 to the Series Number,  for an HMS Entry of A1 23.

                                        In my case, my unit was instructed not to talk about 3 explosions and a chemical alert on appx, Feb 18, 91 at a 7th Corps Water Point, West of Hafar Al Batin. Subsequently there are members who have passed on. And the incident is not noted in the DOD Information Paper: Iraq's SCUD Ballistic Missiles of July 25, 2000. US Space Command detected 97 launches, Iraq admits 93, and CENTCOM confirms only 88. As WW2, Korean , and Vietnam vets fade away,  it would be beneficial to have an honest and ethically correct record of events for future generations.

                                          • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                            Bill Streifer Adventurer

                                            As WW2, Korean , and Vietnam vets fade away,  it would be beneficial to have an honest and ethically correct record of events for future generations.

                                            I totally agree.

                                             

                                            I also think that it's NARA's responsibility (law or no law) to point out obvious disinformation campaigns and such. Suppose a letter, written by Nixon, said he wanted to resign a year earlier than he did. And later, it turns out it was a forgery. Would NARA cite this as "A letter from Nixon" or "A forgery"? I think the latter. But how would NARA even know it was a forgery? Because researchers like us would inform them and provide proof. And if the proof was overwhelming, the "correction" or "caveat" should be part of the official record. Perhaps we should write a letter to the head of NARA, signed by a dozen researchers who agree.

                                             

                                            Regarding your questions concerning FOIA. My FOIA request with the CIA regarding the Pueblo Incident took approximately 14 months to come back. I had long forgot it, so it came as a nice surprise. And McFarland, the academic publisher and publisher of the North Korean Review where my article appeared, agree. Now they may be interested in my three books in the works, all related to North Korean history:  Bill Streifer - heavy water and the atomic bomb We'll see...

                                             

                                            Any more questions?

                                              • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                                When the CIA or NARA fulfilled your FOIA request, was it placed in the Electronic Reading Room, or made available as an open Public Series so the documents could be used by other researchers?  If the CIA Pueblo documents are openly available to the public and other veterans, then there may be other aspects of the operation that may become enlightened to the historic event, that have never been revealed. If the CIA was forth coming with documents concerning the Pueblo, it may have been to draw research away from the actual mission. Does NARA have the military and intel  record files openly available so I may review them?  Thank you for your perspective and concern in maintaining accurate history, as opposed to the insertion of propaganda which will alter the future opinions and human understanding of the events. And what is your opinion of the Online FOIA program, toward the submission of FOIA's and MDR's to NARA?  Thanks for the feed back and information.

                                                  • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                    Bill Streifer Adventurer

                                                    Michael,

                                                     

                                                    Here are my answers in no particular order.

                                                     

                                                    1. The Pueblo Incident was a joint NSA/Naval mission.

                                                    2. Since 2010, over 200 NSA documents have been released.

                                                    3. I haven't seen those 200 documents, and I don't know if all documents have been released, so I filed more FOIA requests targeted for my specific area of interest.

                                                    4. My opinion about releasing FOIA requests to the public? TERRIBLE. Once I published, I didn't care, but I think it stifles researchers like me: If I file a request on XYZ, they post it on their website. If I publish 6 months to a year later (like in a book), the cat is already out of the bag. Terrible!

                                                     

                                                    Bill.

                                                      • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                        Bill Streifer Adventurer

                                                        1. Yes, the Pueblo was part of a larger mission.

                                                        2. I'm writing a book about it: Bill Streifer - heavy water and the atomic bomb .

                                                        3. That Lieutenant retired as a Commander in Naval Intelligence.

                                                        4. the Commander didn't refuse to talk to me. He basically said I didn't know what I was talking about while spouting a lie.

                                                        5. I dragged a journalist into this, and cc'd him the officer's comments.

                                                        6. Then I sent the officer and the journalist a document which shows there was more to the story than has been admitted to. I basically said, "If that's all true, read this..."

                                                         

                                                        If you want to help, contact me directly.

                                                        I can't say more in a public forum.

                                                         

                                                        Bill Streifer

                                                        • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                          Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                                          From what I have seen in the release of the Desert Storm SF135 PDF files, NN3-518-93-2(1), there may actually be a story on those who began to become ill while handling the records at various military installations and record facilities. There was further testing of the military records per the requests of NARA,  for contamination. Air Force Bomb Damage Assessments on the destruction of Iraqi Biological, Chemical and Nuclear facilities throughout Iraq were insightful. The storage of the original records would have been interesting, I can imagine someone entering the room with a mask, gown and gloves. And then almost like General Amherst, offering a blanket as a token peace offering, for official review. I also wonder if NARA now has a policy for receiving potential contaminated documents and articles into the archives? They should. And attempt to decentralize the storage of artifacts. Especially now, with incidents of global pandemics. The memos from the DOD and CENTCOM ensured that the 1st Gulf War documents were not subject to chemical, bio or nuclear contamination. Of course....Perhaps that would be a good FOIA?  Thanks for your input and opinion.  Usually one rabbit hole, leads to another....

                                                            • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                              Bill Streifer Adventurer

                                                              Here's what I know about FOIA requests:.

                                                               

                                                              I must have filed 100 with the FBI, CIA, USPTO, Treasury. DIA, State and others. Some come back with "no documents," so I appeal. Others come back with documents on paper or CD. Others come back with "We can neither confirm nor deny..."

                                                               

                                                              If you think of a FOIA, file it. It takes at most a minute. And there is no limit. File 10 a day, just don't repeat a request; they'll know. Even if they say documents are classified or redacted, file an appeal or another FOIA request to have the redactions removed. It worked for me numerous times. And between you and me, I was shocked what it said beneath the redactions. Can't say more....

                                                               

                                                              If you suspect there were nukes or chemical weapons at a specific facility during the Gulf War, file a FOIA request. Maybe you'll be disappointed or maybe you'll be ecstatic! OK?

                                                               

                                                              Bill Streifer

                                                                • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                                  Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                                                  I am new to this process, and the majority of agencies use search platforms, that will not link the documents, purposely. Therefore the initial FOIA's and MDR's are "no records found".  It has taken a year, and I have now found that NARA does have the majority of Desert Storm records. And many are NOT listed in the Catalog archive. I obtained the SF135's, and even then, the Document Titles did not have a NARA HMS Entry or Series. I reviewed the document descriptions, and noticed a number on the bottom, and then compared the actual records found in the catalog, and deduced that they were placed in a NARA series, progressing by an addition of 12 to the description pages.  NARA staff did not assist in this missing series of numbers. I suggested to look at that series number, and they found the A1 23, Command Records of the Joint Operations Command, of General Schwarzkopf, which has the daily executive summaries, significant event Log, War Book and Emergency Action Procedures.  I just discovered this yesterday, and it hopefully will be declassified and placed in the NARA reading room for veterans and the public to view as the 25th Anniversary of the 1st Gulf War has passed. I also suspect that there are a few records retained at the Washington National Records Center that were not destroyed. Army bio and chem samples were also transported for analysis, most likely at the Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency. I hope NARA does believe in the declassification of the good, bad and the ugly.  In another 25 years, there will be only a few veterans left from the 1st Gulf War. Just like WWII and the Cold War.  The WWII, Japanese Unit 731, also had research scientists and microbiologists  brought to  the US after WWII.  They may have had unofficial contact outside of compartmentalization and possible collaboration with chemists and physicists working in nuclear research?

                                                                  Perhaps even the US research was began through the shadow of Japanese  efforts?  But the aspect of internment and detention in the US, may have erased their contributions from the history books?                

                                                                  • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                                    Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                                                    I have now learned that the computer electronic searches have made the FOIA teams job Much easier to state "no records found".  The researcher must actually suggest where the document is located, or how it can be searched in their secure data bases.  An example: Desert Storm, results in little info, but Persian Gulf War, Record Groups 518, 338,  319 then begin to show HMS Entry Categories.  But there are records that are in between , that are not even listed! It's better to do a FOIA asking for the SF135 Receipt and Transmittal Title Descriptions that must accompany the documents to the agencies STORAGE facility.  Once you receive the Transfer Description and list, then narrow the search, and ask for the specific Document Number and Document Description.  Now it gets tricky, when the agency has numbers that do NOT match the storage facility numbering system.  But there are usually clues and alpha numerical series on the Document Descriptions. I have actually had a FOIA appeal from the pentagon whereby they said the documents are not in the computer, and could be in ANOTHER BUILDING, therefore please drop the FOIA and allow me to close it?  The document transfer lists are the key, because the computer search engines are limited to the FOIA teams, and many of these older documents have not been optically scanned and linked. Some agencies use the WNRC, but they may also use private contract storage facilities, such as salt mines. It actually seems that the time is running out on much of history as the millennial generation is not concerned with thumbing through a bunch of dusty paper.  If its not in the data base,  it never happened. And what's actually in the data base, may not be the real story?

                                                                    Strategic FOIA's are the key, toward getting the younger  generation into the dirty ware house of history.  Hopefully the mice are not chewing up my FOIA record folder  right now.

                                                    • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                      Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                                      While researching the Desert Storm SF135 Transmittal and Receipt Forms for information, I noticed that a large majority of the documents were reviewed by Howard C. H. Feng.   I wonder if he has written any journals or literature toward his experience in reviewing and inspecting the documents?  Is he retired, and has he had any health issues after exposure to the records in 1992?  There are also memos from NARA to the DOD questioning the possible contamination of records.  I can only say that our unit lived in the desert with GP medium tents, sand floors, and the carcasses of dead sheep and animal fur rising from the sand as the temperature in the tent rose.  Even when moving the tent to another location I the camp, another carcass rose next to the hospital liters, we used to initially sleep on, until we received cots.  Living in vehicles and tents and eating MRE's for about 4 months through the desert, and the battalion command base was not much better. Per the memo's It even looks like NARA was concerned with receiving Operational and Reserve Unit record's.  The accusation by the Air Force, that the Commanding General , MAY, have removed records, was met with a statement that they were personal logs dictated to his staff. These Personal Dictations to military or GS staff should have been reviewed by NARA officials, as to determine if they also contained material toward the federal record.  Hopefully  there are safe guards as to define and ensure that personal communications mixed with Government business become the property of the government and the archives. But Mr. Feng did a GOOD JOB ! 

                                                        • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                          Bill Streifer Adventurer

                                                          Regarding Howard C.H. Feng, have you seen this?

                                                          HOWARD C H FENG - ARCHIVIST in COLLEGE PARK

                                                           

                                                          And if you want to know what he's written, why don't you ask him? Maybe you'll have better luck than I had when I tried to get the truth out of the lieutenant in Naval Intelligence (now retired commander) who was involved in the Pueblo Incident.

                                                            • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                              Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                                              A retired O-6 officer is not going to comment on what actually happened. If he even had access to the extent of the Operation. Which as a Lt, back then, he was only doing what he was told.  And did it well, if he, survived the political climate  and retired as a Commander. The Pueblo is still commissioned as a US Navel Vessel and in North Korea.

                                                              The ratings of its crew, and lack of a gunners mate, or tactical air cover, leads me to believe that it was part of a larger operation of deception. or it was a purposeful mission to draw the US into a larger war, which did not occur. The DOD initially denied the crew members the POW Medal. Which was an injustice, that was later remedied. The exposure to the demolition of chemical nerve agents and munitions during Desert Storm was also denied until 1996. And those who complained of medical problems were met with psychiatric examinations by the DOD and VA.  Iraq also used Remotely Piloted Vehicles, FROG missiles, and chemical mines.  A federal employee, is not going to comment on the role of their duties, unless authorized, or under deposition. Prior to reviewing the documents, the proper security clearances would have been met. And all confidentiality statements applied. In some cases this can take more than a year, before adjudication. Back then, it did not include a review of social media sites, and a polygraph. Many documents from the Army and Air Force, were missing pages, and noted as "destroyed".  The NBC logs were missing and portions were found using federal warrants. The Command Chemical logs are missing dates from appx Feb 13 to 20, 1991.  The final investigation found no  wrong doing. The Pueblo would be similar. The crew and captain were initially admonished for not using the 50 cal machine guns, that they were not even trained on.  The use of the inadequate 50 cal would have most likely resulted in the Pueblo being attacked by the Korean Migs, and sunk. Which may have been the intent of the mission.  Drawing the US into an invasion of the North. It's a case of those who attempt to start Armageddon and WWIII and those who attempt to prevent it,  and the majority caught in the middle

                                                              just raising families and trying to make a living. The Pueblo should stay in North Korea, but a US Naval Officer should

                                                              be permitted to return on it's date of commission each year to hoist the colors.

                                                  • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                    Bill Streifer Adventurer

                                                    I have already contacted a member of that agency. However, since he's retired, he would be unable to change the record. But I've also obtained documents from two other U.S. Govt. Intelligence agencies -- declassified secret and top-secret reports -- that admit the original story was not entirely true and for good reason.

                                                      • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                        Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                                        The National Archives receives the information, recordings, videos  and documents from various agencies. And it would be difficult to verify the authenticity due to the compartmentalization of the material. And in some cases information may never be released to the public, or it is so heavily redacted that it would be of no benefit to clarify the historic record. The Korean peninsula is technically in a state of truce and cease fire, and the war still has not ended. US Service members who have served there since the Korean Conflict now earn the Korean Defense Service Medal. Service members who served in 1968 along the Korean DMZ were eligible for the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal. 

                                                        In many cases military events and operations are omitted from the formal record or the events are altered as to minimize the information involving public and international political perception.  In some instances there are facts within the disinformation.  Many FOIA's result in "records not found" because they are not in the electronic data base. The SF135's are in most cases unclassified.  But within the specific SF135's  document descriptions there may be clues as to requesting information that was once referred to as "not found".  You must also understand that those who work for NARA or an Agency may now be at an age where they have no historic reference or memory toward the event. And just don't know where to search or find it. Records and events also become lost in the beurocratic maze between agencies.  The information concerning agent orange in Vietnam and along the Korean DMZ took 20 years of research.

                                                        Those employees working with the information are also constrained with agency policies and FOIA  guidelines. I myself, am amazed that many Gulf War veterans are not more diligent in presenting the historic events. Many have attempted to obtain military medical records and FOIA's and received the "no records found " response, and then dropped the issue.  A researcher must be determined and have some measure of luck.  It seems that you have received documentation toward the possible events concerning the US Pueblo.  If the record is inaccurate, and the sailors were done an injustice, then a congressional and senate letter would be appropriate to the respective armed service committees and potential veterans service organizations such as the VFW and American Legion.

                                                          • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                            Bill Streifer Adventurer

                                                            Everything you say is true,, but I'll leave you with two final points:

                                                             

                                                            1. Correcting EVERY record would of course be impossible. However, when a record is found to be largely inaccurate or largely propaganda, there should be a mechanism for presenting evidence in the form of a "top sheet" that says, "NARA has received evidence that many of the 'facts' as presented in these intelligence documents are inaccurate or were created merely as a form of propaganda. For this reason, we urge you to take the information in this folder with a grain of salt."

                                                             

                                                            2. While I have uncovered evidence that the events surrounding the Pueblo Incident are not as they have been portrayed, the information I obtained has nothing to do with the actual capture of the crew or their treatment, so there's no reason to reach out to the VFW. Besides, when I asked the VFW if I could give a talk on what I had discovered, they never responded. Here's my recent article in the North Korean Review on the subject, published by McFarland (an academic publisher): Anything Could Happen: Newly Declassified CIA Documents Tell an Entirely Different North Korea ''Pueblo Incident'' by Bi… My article is based on newly-declassified CIA documents. They were declassified for me in late-2015 .  ,

                                                              • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                                Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                                                I am currently researching events which occurred during Desert Storm, as a former Army veteran, whereby the Information Paper: Iraq's SCUD Ballistic Missiles, does not display all the SCUD launches and impact sites. It omits SCUD impacts West of Hafar Al Batin in the 7th Corps sector, from the 15th to the 19th of Feb 1991. I have found the Army 7th Corps 332 MED Brigade log, whereby an entry at 0218 am 16 Feb 91 was made toward 2 SCUD impacts, and conference call, noting confirmed and coordinates logged, which are not documented in the information paper.  How long did it take to have the FOIA answered and receive a document? Did you obtain a waiver to the fees?  If Military Branches and Agencies are creating false briefings, after action reports and summaries, and then blaming it on faulty intelligence, then is there an official  formal remedy, board or committee at each agency? The DOJ has an Ethics Officer. But purposeful disinformation and omissions in the historic records  are similar to destroying records as to sway public opinion and destroy evidence of fault? In the case of the Pueblo Briefing,  the military officer ordering the briefing and  performing the briefing,  were they aware of conflicting information? Did they benefit by receiving a promotion  or  favorable eval and assignment? Perhaps each agency needs an office of ethics and information integrity?                     

                                                          • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                            Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                                            This is interesting, concerning how historic data is presented during the Cold War.  When observing the Defense Casualty Analysis System incidents during the  Cold War, there is an airman listed as an accidental death, when he was involved in a explosion by the Red Army Faction in the Frankfurt W. German Air base in 1985. Many of the casualties are not listed as hostile. A liaison officer shot in East Germany by a soviet guard, is not listed as a hostile casualty.  Even though he is listed as the last casualty of the Cold War in1985. The 1983 Marine bombing in Lebanon is also due to terrorist acts. And the casualties during the 1992 Battle for Mogadishu, Black Hawk Down,  in Somalia are not listed as hostile, but due to terrorist action. The rules of engagement and designation of paramilitary and civilian insurgent forces changed in 2001, whereby the classification of casualties also changed.  But those that occurred prior during the Cold War, did not change. History was basically being defined and written to the specifications. The only ones who would be aware, are those that were there and had first hand knowledge of the events.

                                                              • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                                Bill Streifer Adventurer

                                                                "The only ones who would be aware, are those that were there and had first hand knowledge of the events."

                                                                 

                                                                Actually no.

                                                                 

                                                                There are two types of information from intelligence sources: 1) the information and disinformation released to the public. 2) the absolute truth contained in -- often classified -- documents.

                                                                 

                                                                When I contacted NARA about the areas of the Pueblo Incident I was most interested, they said they had 150 BOXES, not 300 BOXES, no, maybe 500 BOXES of documents (I lost count) on the subject, but they all remain classified!

                                                                 

                                                                So I contacted the head of classification at NARA who agreed to investigate. I haven't heard back yet. But he informed me of the following: If NARA were to do a classification review on 500 boxes, they would have to dedicate their entire staff to one project, mine. They can't, of course, so what they might do is summarize the boxes so that I can choose the one box that's most promising.

                                                                 

                                                                He also informed me that there's a 50-year mandatory review, so he's not sure yet if the best way to approach this is through FOIA or Mandatory Declassification Review (MDR).

                                                                 

                                                                Stay tuned!

                                                                  • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                                    Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                                                    There should be SF258 or SF135 Receipt and Transmittal Forms that describe the contents of the boxes and folders, related to the Pueblo. But there could be portions in military records throughout the Korean DMZ period. Information at the lower soldier, division-corps, or  sailor , ship-fleet level, would be minimal, since they are kept in the dark with offensive or defensive maneuvers and tactics. The Joint Commands, United Nations and Strategic Commands would have a higher level of the Planning, Operations and intelligence information. In running the ant farm.  In the case of the Pueblo, it would most likely lead to records, whereby the ship was denied US air and naval suppressive cover during the confrontation. The Fleet commander was most likely told to stand down, and allowed the ship to taken into N. Korean custody. A communication to the White House was also most likely made. But the Sec. of the Navy, and Defense were most likely afraid of an escalating ground war along the Korean DMZ. Also, after watching an interesting video on the Japanese effort toward the A Bomb. And a Review of the wiki list of notable physicists. It seems that there are very few Japanese Physicists that are listed that would have been mid career or appx 30-40 yrs old during WWII?

                                                                    Was the A-Bomb project being financially promoted through an international banking conglomerate prior too and during WWII?

                                                                • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                                  Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                                                  I have also been researching the events of Desert Storm and the 1st Gulf War. Whereby much of the records remain restricted. Those that are available through the GulfLINK declassification project , have minimal content. The majority of the Desert Storm records cannot be optically searched, and must be analyzed through the SF135 Transmittal and Receipt Forms.  The Desert Storm records are now over 25 years old and

                                                                  Unit Logs, After Action Reports, Battle Damage Reports and Memorandums have not been released through Mandatory Declassification Reviews.  The subsequent admission of the DOD Sarin nerve agent plume, almost 5 years after the end of the war, has been relatively removed from history by the 2nd Persian Gulf War. Those records which have undergone an initial declassification should be available, in a similar manner to those from Vietnam, and Korea. It would also be interesting to have the actual audio signal and radio communications  during the conflict and armored battles.  It would be nice if the Desert Storm documents, and SF135 PDF files were not restricted as to present the historic facts now. Rather than have our great grand children attempt to imagine what the historic truth was after our generation is gone...

                                                                  • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                                    Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                                                    Hey Bill,

                                                                    I found some interesting data on FOIA Online, concerning the Classified Motion Pictures. Number 265, Image 263, Item 2243 has the Pueblo Crew in North Korea, 1968. Accession NN3-263-04-006. Perform a specific NARA Search for Classified Motion Pictures, or ACCIPITER.    Number 146 has Mustard Spray Tests with Multiple Planes 1944,

                                                                    NN3-111-91-06 , NPR News, 6-22-15,  has an article about Mustard testing by race, on a Panamanian Island on US Army soldiers during WW2.  Your discussion of film, got me thinking.  On the bottom of the list there are 12 dated missions during Desert Storm, titled Mocking Bird/ Opus. They correspond to the BLU-82 Air Fuel bombs used to clear mines and potential chemical lanes during Desert Storm,  Looks like there's an extra one beside the 11 the air force states.  Most likely a drop on a troop concentration.  The one after that is titled ACCIPITER in capitals,  which means hawk .  Why would it be in all caps, and no date, after the BLU-82's? I actually requested the Desert Storm moving Aerial images SF135 Inventory,  listed in the Public Catalog.  But they would not provide it, even they have  released the titles of the tapes twice in 2013?  I also wanted the Inventory of the ground moving images and their titles. They released video of the MOAB used in Afghanistan, but none of the BLU-82's in Desert Storm. Actually saw the C130 drop one in our 7th Corps sector across  the border before the ground war.  What other weapon could have been used during the final day of the ground war that could have seismically registered as an earthquake.  I actually FIOA 'd the ACCIPITER  video, and have an Appeal to the Deputy Archivist.  I also FOIA'd the Record Testing data , and scientific conclusions of the mas spectrometry NARA contracted as described in the NARA Memos of NN3-518-93-2. I  have been studying the research on DDT, since there is minimal data  on sarin. But the accession numbers involving these motion pictures is interesting? What do you speculate ACCIPTER is?

                                                                    • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                                      Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                                                      Bill Again,

                                                                      Please review the FOIA Improvement Act of June 30, 2016 and the DOJ OIP Office of Information and Policy guide toward its compliance. It promotes the use of a FOIA portal, and the Online Public Catalog. The " Rule of 3" and routine information to be posted in electronic format for public view. The  philosophy of "release to one and release to all".. Each agency must now provide 90 days or appeals, and refer to the FOIA Liaison in its responses. The GIA Government  Information Agency has a expanded role.  They have accountability reports  to the Attorney General since it is considered historic evidence. They also have a Committee Meeting and public forum with feedback. It's was recently held, and can be seen on YouTube,  You can provide a public comment be email.  I did, and it will be entered into the record. I felt that the committee needed a broader range of diversity, as to include medical, engineering and scientific professionals.  The dynamics and paradigms concerning information can radically change as accountability to the public gains momentum. Please review the DOJ OIP FOIA Improvement guideline for federal agencies.

                                                                      • Re: Is NARA responsible for another U.S. agency's disinformation campaign?
                                                                        Michael Tomko Adventurer

                                                                        Hopefully more information is declassified as to have an accurate portrait of events. There' s an article by Scott Shane, on Feb 21 , 2006, "US Reclassifies many documents in secret review",  which describes how in 1999 they began a 7 year program to Reclassify documents that were declassified in 1995.  That would have been the 1995 Declassification Project on the nerve agent exposure at Khamisiyah and other events during Desert Storm. They started in 1999 and reclassified everything. They pulled more than 55K declassified documents. And that was before the wars in Afghanistan or the 2nd Iraq War. There was no media attention, so it never received any public scrutiny. There's always an underlying motive.