3 Replies Latest reply on Dec 2, 2021 1:44 PM by Jason Atkinson

    Were all wounds reported on an Army soldier's medical records?

    Leslie Martin Newbie

      My dad served in the Army in WWII, was wounded, spent time in hospitals and had lifelong effects. However, the documentation lists only one of two wounds. Although Dad is now deceased, I am the family genealogist and would like to know the full story. Does anyone know anything about the practice of listing only some wounds on the official records? Thank you.

        • Re: Were all wounds reported on an Army soldier's medical records?
          Jason Atkinson Guide

          Dear Mr. Martin,

          Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

          In general, if soldiers were treated by a unit medic or aid station, it was less likely that their injury and treatment would be documented. The worst cases were sent to the hospitals. Hospitals kept better records about their individual patients. Unfortunately, because we lack any specific information of what happened, we can only speculate as to why both wounds were not documented.

           

          We hope this is helpful.

          1 person found this helpful
            • Re: Were all wounds reported on an Army soldier's medical records?
              Leslie Martin Newbie

              Sincerest thanks for your reply. My dad was in the hospital for months so the undisclosed wound remains a mystery. We can’t help but wonder if it was deemed too personal. Are you aware of any such practice?

               

              I suppose that in addition to “fair,” all is also “possible” in war and love.

                • Re: Were all wounds reported on an Army soldier's medical records?
                  Jason Atkinson Guide

                  Dear Mr. Martin,

                  Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

                   

                  It is unlikely that a medical file would not include information which was reported to the facility that created the files simply because it is considered private, as medical files are generally assumed to be confidential in nature. Plus failing to record complete information about a person’s injuries for the sake of privacy could impair medical treatment.  It is possible that under many circumstances, medical information about an individual which is released to a third party may include redactions.

                   

                  Also, if the hospital treatment was performed by the VA after he was separated from the Army, diagnosis and treatment information may not be included in the medical files created during when he was active duty.

                   

                  We hope this is helpful.

                   

                  1 person found this helpful