7 Replies Latest reply on Oct 26, 2021 11:40 AM by Rebecca Collier

    Seeking birth certificate from Freedman's Hospital

    Gail Murphy Wayfarer

      I have been having an issue finding a birth certificate from 1964 from Freedman's Hospital.  I have contacted vital records and they do not have the records to pull.  I have spoken and requested a copy of the certificate and received a search certificate.  I have also filled out a search file from Howard and there not sure they have the records for Freedman's prior to 1980.  The search came up empty and I'm back looking for information.  I'm just lost and can't figure out what's the next step. Do you have any ideas?

        • Re: Seeking birth certificate from Freedman's Hospital
          Alice Lane Pioneer

          Hi Gail,

          Is the person in question still living?

          There are many times that a person would need to show a birth certificate or proof of age.

          1. To get a Social Security Card

          2. To get a Driver's license.

          3. School Enrollment

          4. Military

          5. in a bar

          and etc.

          Alice Lane

          Research Volunteer.

            • Re: Seeking birth certificate from Freedman's Hospital
              Gail Murphy Wayfarer

              I have been having an issue finding a birth certificate from 1964 from Freedman's Hospital.  I have contacted vital records and they do not have the records to pull.  I have spoken and requested a copy of the certificate and received a search certificate.  I have also filled out a search file from Howard and there not sure they have the records for Freedman's prior to 1980.  The search came up empty and I'm back looking for information.  I'm just lost and can't figure out what's the next step. Do you have any ideas?

            • Re: Seeking birth certificate from Freedman's Hospital
              Gail Murphy Wayfarer

              Yes, he's still alive, he's 57.  He was born on April 5, 1964.  Served in the military for over 12 years but didn't have a birth certificate.  He had the search certificate that  Vital records in Washington, DC provided. Back in the 1970s when we received our social security card a birth certificate was not necessary and when we went to school in the 1980s we took driver's ed which provided a certificate.  A birth certificate was not needed to get your license.  A school id and the certificate from the school let you get your driver's license back then.

               

              We have gone through vital records and completed a search at Howard medical which took over Freedman's hospital in the late 1970s I believe which turned up no records. I've contacted several lawyers to try and get a delayed birth certificate done but they're not even sure how to handle the case because they have never heard of anything like this. I'm at a loss. I'm looking for what happened to those records of Freedman's hospital which was under the control of Congress and The inspector General at that time.

               

                • Re: Seeking birth certificate from Freedman's Hospital
                  Alice Lane Pioneer

                  Hi Gail,

                  This is something that I have noticed that people have done in these situations. They find witnesses who were there at the time of the birth or can confirm that his mother had him. Maybe there is a birth notice in a newspaper. A neighbor who can verify the birth. I believe you would need two witnesses in some states. Since D.C. is not a state you would need to check the procedure there. Go to newspapers.com, you can get a free trial to search for birth announcements. I am surprised that he does not have one for 1964, birth records were kept then.

                  Alice Lane

                • Re: Seeking birth certificate from Freedman's Hospital
                  Lisha Penn Pioneer

                  Dear Ms. Murphy,

                   

                  Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

                   

                  We suggest that you request a copy of his Official Military Personnel File (OMPF) that may include birth certificate-related information if you have not already done so. OMPFs and individual medical reports for those who served in the U.S. Army after 1958 and before October 16, 1992 are in the custody of NARA's National Personnel Records Center (NPRC) in St. Louis. In many cases where personnel records were destroyed in the 1973 fire, proof of service can be provided from other records such as morning reports, payrolls, and military orders, and a certificate of military service will be issued. Please complete a GSA Standard Form 180 and mail it to NARA's National Personnel Records Center, (Military Personnel Records), 1 Archives Drive, St. Louis, MO  63138-1002. Veterans and their next of kin also may use eVetRecs to request records. See eVetRecs Help for instructions. Certain information in the records is not available to the general public without the written consent of the veteran or his next of kin. For more information see Request Military Service Records.

                   

                  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, NPRC will continue servicing requests ONLY associated with medical treatments, burials, homeless veterans seeking admittance to a homeless shelter, and those involving the VA Home Loan program. If your request is urgent, please see Emergency Requests and Deadlines. Please refrain from submitting non-emergency requests such as replacement medals, administrative corrections, or records research until NPRC returns to pre-COVID staffing levels.  Please check archives.gov/veterans for updates to the NPRC operating hours and status. We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience.

                   

                  Howard University Hospital or its predecessor, Freedmen’s Hospital, would not have issued a birth certificate for his birth. Instead, the hospital would have submitted his birth information for the city to officially record his birth. In the United States, there is no national (federal) birth registry, as you might see in other nations, such as the United Kingdom. Within each state, the management of birth certificates might be further decentralized, with data collected and certificates issued at the county or municipal level. Birth data is submitted to the state, county, or municipality by parents, doctors, midwives, and hospitals, typically via paper or electronic forms.

                   

                  We suggest that you contact the DC Health Vital Records Division again to request another search or request a Replacement Birth Certificate. Please accurately provide the names of his parents and their birth places; and his birth place and date. If any information is incorrect, it may result in not locating the correct record. In addition, if he was baptised or part of other religious ceremonies, you may ask the religious organization, such as church or temple, to research their documents which results in some additional information.

                   

                  You may find useful tips in the FamilySearch wiki District of Columbia Vital Records.

                   

                  We hope this is helpful. Best of luck with your research!

                   

                    • Re: Seeking birth certificate from Freedman's Hospital
                      Gail Murphy Wayfarer

                      When he enlisted he didn't have a birth certificate only a search certificate from the District of Columbia.  We order his records and the original search certificate was not included in his file.

                       

                      I ran across some information that Freedman's Hospital was controlled by the government but it transition to Howard University.

                       

                      "Prior to 1967, I believe Freedmen's Hospital was still controlled by the federal government. You may want to contact the National Archives or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Howard University's Mooreland-Spingarn Research Center."

                       

                      I've never heard of Mooreland-Spingarn research center.

                        • Re: Seeking birth certificate from Freedman's Hospital
                          Rebecca Collier Ranger

                          Dear Ms. Murphy,

                           

                          Thank you for posting your follow-up request on History Hub!

                           

                          As stated in our previous reply, Howard University Hospital or its predecessor, Freedmen’s Hospital, would not have issued a birth certificate for his birth. Instead, the hospital would have submitted his birth information for the District of Columbia to officially record his birth. Although the National Archives does have custody of many records of the District of Columbia, vital records such as birth, death, and marriage records remain in the custody of the city.

                           

                          Therefore, we suggest that you contact the DC Health Vital Records Division again to request another search or request a Replacement Birth Certificate. Please accurately provide the names of his parents and their birth places; and his birth place and date. If any information is incorrect, it may result in not locating the correct record. In addition, if he was baptized or part of other religious ceremonies, you may ask the religious organization, such as church or temple, to research their documents which result in some additional information.

                           

                          The Moorland-Spingarn Research Center is the main library of Howard University and has a small collection about the Freedman’s Hospital.

                           

                          We hope this is helpful. Best of luck with your family research!

                           

                           

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