2 Replies Latest reply on Aug 27, 2021 9:00 AM by Rachael Salyer

    Trying to identify European Military Medals on postcard

    Shawn Fettig Newbie

      Hey Folks: I've come across a postcard with an image from the late 1800s-early 1900s (I'm guessing) of men in military uniforms - most with medals that appear to be European in origin.  I have had no luck in matching these metal/ribbon styles with any archive I've gone through.  Wondering if any of y'all are, or know anyone that is, somewhat of an expert in this area.  If so, please feel free to reach out and we can arrange for me to share the image.  Thanks.  - Shawn

        • Re: Trying to identify European Military Medals on postcard
          Jeremy Crabb Adventurer

          Shawn,

           

          I can probably help, I know a lot about medals. What makes you think they're from the late 1800s, early 1900s?

          • Re: Trying to identify European Military Medals on postcard
            Rachael Salyer Pioneer

            Dear Mr. Fettig,

             

            Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

             

            In order to possibly identify the origin of the military uniforms and decorations from the postcard image, you will need to determine the specific country and branch of service that are represented. We suggest using the other details from the postcard as a starting point for your research. For example, the language of any text in the image, printed on the reverse, or written by the sender may point to a country of origin for the image, as might the name of the photographic studio or printer where the image or card were produced. A postmark and stamp could also be useful in determining a possible source and timeframe for the postcard. Additional details from the image itself might also help narrow down your search. If there are any buildings, landmarks, weapons, vehicles, or objects in the image, for instance, then they might help point you in the right direction. Details from the uniforms themselves should also be considered, including the cut of each piece, the style of hats and boots, other decorative elements like braids or epaulets, and so forth.

             

            We also suggest that you search WorldCat for relevant books or scholars on the subject, and a reference librarian at your local or university library may also be able to guide you to additional useful resources.

             

            Finally, the style of the postcard and photograph themselves could also provide some clues for you to follow. The Smithsonian provides some online information about Postcard History and Dating Postcards, and the Library of Congress offers a Research Guide to Postcards, too. You may wish to contact them or the National Postal Museum to see if they can offer you any further assistance.

             

            We hope this information is helpful. Best of luck with your research!