4 Replies Latest reply on Sep 5, 2021 1:45 PM by Michael Gaussa

    Looking for my grandfather's Naturalization Certificate

    Veronica Olson Newbie

      I have all of the Naturalization Records: Intention, Petition, Oath, but not the Naturalization Certificate.  Does NARA have this?

        • Re: Looking for my grandfather's Naturalization Certificate
          Alice Lane Pioneer

          Hi Veronica

          Welcome to History Hub

          This is an answer to your question from a previous post by Lisha Penn

          Re: Seeking a copy of my deceased grandfather's naturalization certificate

           

          Dear Ms. Jackson,

           

           

          If his naturalization took place in a Federal court, naturalization indexes, declarations of intention (with any accompanying certificates of arrival), and petitions for naturalization will usually be in the National Archives facility serving the state in which the Federal court is located.

           

          To ensure a successful request with the National Archives your request should include:

          • Name of petitioner (including known variants)
          • Date of birth
          • Approximate date of entry to the United States
          • Approximate date of naturalization
          • Where the individual resided at the time of naturalization (city/county/state)
          • Country of origin

           

          In most cases, the National Archives will not have a copy of the certificate of citizenship. Two copies of the certificate were created – one given to the petitioner as proof of citizenship, and one forwarded to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS).

           

          You can place a request with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Genealogy Program at www.uscis.gov/genealogy to obtain a copy of the certificate of citizenship as the agency maintains the historic INS record series where certificates were filed.

           

          You may wish to review NARA’s Naturalization Records website to learn more about these records.

           

          We hope this is helpful. Best of luck with your family research!

           

          [Information provided by Elizabeth Burnes, Subject Matter Expert]

           

          2 people found this helpful

           

          Alice Lane.

          Research Volunteer

           

           

           

           

          1 person found this helpful
          • Re: Looking for my grandfather's Naturalization Certificate
            Susannah Brooks Pioneer

            The naturalization certificate would have been given to your grandfather.  USCIS may have a copy of it.

            • Re: Looking for my grandfather's Naturalization Certificate
              Charlie Busch Adventurer

              Dear Ms. Olson,

              Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

               

              In most cases, the National Archives will not have a copy of the certificate of citizenship. Two copies of the certificate were created – one given to the petitioner as proof of citizenship, and one forwarded to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS).

               

              Certificates of citizenship were issued by the Federal courts until October 1991 when INS took over responsibility for naturalization proceedings. Certificates may be requested through the USCIS Genealogy Program.

               

              We hope this is helpful. Best of luck with your family research!

               

              1 person found this helpful
                • Re: Looking for my grandfather's Naturalization Certificate
                  Michael Gaussa Wayfarer

                  I defer to the expert archivists on this site who I have found extremely helpful, but....

                   

                  Wouldn't the location of the Certificate of Naturalization depend on when the person naturalized?

                  My great grandfather naturalized in 1891 and his record was available at NARA.  The record at NARA was not the actual certificate with beautiful seal and calligraphy, which I have proudly framed on my wall, but a mass printed agency type record. 

                   

                  Upon the recommendation of the wonderful people at NARA, I ordered an index search for this same record with USCIS in order to receive an official response from them that the record does not exist in their files.

                   

                  (It could be that the experts concluded that since this is the grandfather of a living relative, records from this time period could only be held at USCIS, and therefore did not need to ask the date of naturalization.)