3 Replies Latest reply on Jul 23, 2021 10:01 AM by Jason Atkinson

    Seeking WWI Army records for Marshall Bland

    David Bland Newbie

      Looking for any information on my grandfather MARSHALL BLAND

      BORN IN 1892 OF APRIL DIED IN 1969 IM DOING A FAMILY

      RESEARCH ON HIM AND THE NAME BLAND .

      NOW TO UNDERSTAND THIS CRAZY SITUATION IS THAT

      I HAVE FOUND 3 DETERRENT BIRTH CERTIFICATE FROM 3 DETERRENT STATE'S

      1 BURKE COUNTY GA

      2 WEST VIRGINIA

      3 SOUTH CAROLINA

      Now on 1 BIRTH CERTIFICATE IT SAYING HIS MOTHER NAME IS REBECCA WILLIAM

      ON ANOTHER BIRTH CERTIFICATE IT'S SAYING HIS MOTHER'S NAME IS NANCY HALONA

      IT'S GETTING CRAZY I REALLY DON'T KNOW WHAT TO BELIEVE

      NOW MY NAME IS DAVID MARSHALL BLAND

       

      AND NOW EVERYBODY WONDERING WHERE DID THE NAME. BLAND COME FROM AND

      WHO'S NAME IS IT HIS MOTHER'S LAST NAME OR FATHER'S

      I WAS HOPEFUL THAT HIS ARMY RECORDS HAS THE TRUTH.

       

      ANY AN ALL HELP WILL BE TRULY APPRECIATED

       

      Thank you

        • Re: Seeking WWI Army records for Marshall Bland
          Elliot Schneider Ranger

          David,

           

          Here is where he is buried at fellowship church. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/56952152/marshall-l-bland

           

           

           

          WW 1 Draft Card:

           

          I believe this is the information you are seeking dates of birth and death match. Additionally the widow is listed as Hattie L. Bland.

           

          1 person found this helpful
          • Re: Seeking WWI Army records for Marshall Bland
            Robert Weaver Newbie

            The name BLAND came from the English or the French, it's not certain which used it first. There are also several variations of that name. There are also several very good ways to research where a person came from and who the members of his family were, but to find out the correct person you'll need to do a lot of research. Here are some things that might help.

             

            To begin with don't worry that you've found several different birth certification and different places of birth because, as you research, you will find that several different people have the same name as your grandfather, and you might even find that your grandfather and one or more people were born in the same place and at the same time. I found that out with my own grandfather. The other thing to remember is that in the 1800s very few states used birth certificates much less record a birth. A death is different, just about all cemeteries recorded burials.

             

            Here are some ways to find the right information.

             

            Start with you mother or father, whichever has BLAND as their last name. Also remember that your mother's maiden name changed when she married. If it's your father, get a copy of his original social security card application. That will have his social security number, date and place of birth and names of his mother and father. This will give you the correct spelling of your grandfather's full name. Go to ssa.gov for this information.

             

            Go to findagrave.com to locate where your grandfather is buried. You'll need to know which state he is buried in. Once you have this, use find a grave to locate which cemetery he's in. Once you have that, contact the cemetery and get a copy of the info card filled out at the time of burial. This might have his SSAN.

             

            To locate his WWI service record, go to archives.gov/veterans. This will guide you through obtaining copies of his official service record. There is a cost for this but it's worth it. You will need his SSAN and/or WWI service number.

             

            If you are starting a family tree, go to ancestry.com. This site will be of great help.

             

            I hope this information has helped you. I have been doing family research for over twenty years and had to start with no information on either side of my family, but now I have over 6,000 names and have been able to track my family back to the eight century. It's hard work, but if you are willing, it's worthwhile.

             

            Good luck!

            • Re: Seeking WWI Army records for Marshall Bland
              Jason Atkinson Ranger

              Dear Mr. Bland,

               

              Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

               

              We suggest that you request a copy of his Official Military Personnel File (OMPF). OMPFs and individual medical reports for enlisted men of the U.S. Army who were separated from the service after October 1912 and before 1959 are in the custody of NARA's National Personnel Records Center (NPRC) in St. Louis. In many cases where personnel records were destroyed in the 1973 fire, proof of service can be provided from other records such as morning reports, payrolls, and military orders, and a certificate of military service will be issued. Please complete a GSA Standard Form 180 and mail it to NARA's National Personnel Records Center, (Military Personnel Records), 1 Archives Drive, St. Louis, MO  63138-1002. If there is any information requested by the form that you do not know, you may omit it or provide estimates (such as for dates), but the more information you provide, the easier it will be to locate the correct file if it survived the fire. For more information see Official Military Personnel Files (OMPF), Archival Records Requests.

               

              If the DD Form 1330 Application for Headstone or Marker that Mr. Schneider located for you is for the correct person, please be sure to include the service number 2 649 404, the date entered of 4-4-1918, and the date released of 7-30-1919 on the SF-180.

               

              Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, NPRC will continue servicing requests ONLY associated with medical treatments, burials, homeless veterans seeking admittance to a homeless shelter, and those involving the VA Home Loan program. If your request is urgent, please see Emergency Requests and Deadlines. Please refrain from submitting non-emergency requests such as replacement medals, administrative corrections, or records research until NPRC returns to pre-COVID staffing levels.  Please check archives.gov/veterans for updates to the NPRC operating hours and status. We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience.

               

              We hope this is helpful. Best of luck with your family research!