1 Reply Latest reply on Jul 13, 2021 4:05 PM by Rachael Salyer

    Seeking records of father and the XX Corps

    John James Newbie

      My father was a Captain with the XX Corps Headquarters staff during WWII. I have little to no information about his experiences there since his military records were lost in the fire at the Records Center in 1973. I once used a researcher to review records at the Maryland site, but got little results. Since the HQ, XX Corps was a relatively small unit there is not unit affiliation group to draw information from. Will the archives eventually have all the WWII records available online for everyone to review and search?

        • Re: Seeking records of father and the XX Corps
          Rachael Salyer Tracker

          Dear Mr. James,

           

          Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

           

          Since your father’s Official Military Personnel File (OMPF) was destroyed in the 1973 fire, you may wish to request morning reports and possibly monthly rosters for his unit to learn more about his service. Morning reports for Army units from November 1, 1912 to 1959 and copies of most of the monthly rosters from November 1912 - 1943 and 1947 - 1959 for Army units are in the custody of the National Archives at St. Louis (RL-SL). For more information about these records, please contact RL-SL via email at stl.archives@nara.gov. Rosters for units serving in World War II from 1944 - 1946 were destroyed in accordance with Army disposition authorities.

           

          We searched the National Archives Catalog and located the series Moving Images Relating to Military Activities, 1947-1964 in the Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer (Record Group 111) that contains 21 files related to the XX Corps in the 1940s. These records have been digitized and may be viewed online in the Catalog. You may contact the National Archives at College Park - Motion Pictures (RDSM) at mopix@nara.gov with any questions you might have about these records. 

           

          Next, we located the series Index to Personalities in the U.S. Army Signal Corps Photographic Files, 1941-1980 in Record Group 111, which contains 13 references to the XX Corps in the 1940s. This index has been digitized and may be viewed online in the Catalog. For more information about the index and the photographs it relates to, please contact the National Archives at College Park - Still Pictures (RDSS) at stillpix@nara.gov.

           

          In addition, we located 28 file units and 8 series of records related to the XX Corps during the 1940s in various record groups that might be of interest to you. Although these records generally do not contain information about individuals, they might provide some useful context for your father’s service. Some of these records have been digitized and may be viewed online via the Catalog. For access to and information about the non-digitized records, please contact the National Archives at College Park - Textual Reference (RDT2) at archives2reference@nara.gov.

           

          Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and pursuant to guidance received from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), NARA has adjusted its normal operations to balance the need of completing its mission-critical work while also adhering to the recommended social distancing for the safety of NARA staff. As a result of this re-prioritization of activities, you may experience a delay in receiving an initial acknowledgement as well as a substantive response to your reference request from RL-SL, RDSM, RDSS, and RDT2. We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience.

           

          Regarding digitization, the National Archives is constantly expanding its digitization efforts, and as records are digitized, they are made available online via the National Archives Catalog. Given the vast extent of our holdings, it is extremely unlikely that all of our records will ever be digitized; however, new projects are always being considered and undertaken. You can learn more about Digitization at the National Archives on our website.

           

          We hope this information is helpful. Best of luck with your family research!