1 Reply Latest reply on May 24, 2021 11:17 AM by Alex Champion

    Need to locate my great grandfather's immigration papers/application and draft card.

    Alexandra Bucko Newbie

      Hello!

       

      I'm on a quest for my great-grandfather's immigration application and validation along with his military draft card. I have found copies of the draft card and naturalization/citizenship card on Ancestry and need to get the actual copies. I am hoping to find the full immigration application, too. He was approved and applied in Hammond, IN. Immigration was in 1916.

        • Re: Need to locate my great grandfather's immigration papers/application and draft card.
          Alex Champion Adventurer

          Thank you for posting to History Hub!

           

          Immigration records and the guidance to locate them vary depending on the date of immigration and the port of entry.

           

          Beginning September 27, 1906, the responsibility for naturalization proceedings was transferred to the Federal courts. It took time for the lower courts to let go of the practice, so researchers may need to look at lower courts if the National Archives does not maintain a record of naturalization from the early-mid 20th century.

           

          In general, naturalization was a two-step process* that took a minimum of five years. After residing in the United States for two years, an alien could file a "declaration of intention" ("first papers") to become a citizen. After three additional years, the alien could "petition for naturalization" (”second papers”). After the petition was granted, a certificate of citizenship was issued to the alien. These two steps did not have to take place in the same court.  [*Exceptions can include cases of derivative citizenship, processes for minor aliens 1824-1906, and special consideration for veterans.]

           

          If a naturalization took place in a Federal court, naturalization indexes, declarations of intention (with any accompanying certificates of arrival), and petitions for naturalization will usually be in the National Archives facility serving the state in which the Federal court is located. No central index exists. To ensure a successful request with the National Archives researchers should include: the name of petitioner (including known variants); date of birth; approximate date of entry to the US; approximate date of naturalization; where the individual was residing at the time of naturalization (city/county/state); and country of origin.

           

          Selective Service records for individuals who served after World War I and were born before 1960 are in the custody of the National Archives at St. Louis (RL-SL). There are two types of records: cards and classification histories.  The individual Draft Registration Card (SSS Form 1) may contain information such as: name, Selective Service registration number, age, date and place of birth, ethnicity, place of residence at time of registration and basic physical description. The Classification History (SSS Form 102) may contain: name; date of birth; classification and date of mailing notice; date of appeal to the board; date and results of armed forces physical examination; entry into active duty or civilian work in lieu of induction (may include date, branch of service entered and mode of entry, such as enlisted or ordered); date of separation from active duty or civilian work; and general remarks. Please complete a Form NA-13172 to request a search of these records and email it to RL-SL at stl.archives@nara.gov.

           

          Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and pursuant to guidance received from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), NARA has adjusted its normal operations to balance the need of completing its mission-critical work while also adhering to the recommended social distancing for the safety of NARA staff. As a result of this re-prioritization of activities, you may experience a delay in receiving an initial acknowledgement as well as a substantive response to your reference request from RL-SL.

           

          In 1948, the Congress authorized the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) to provide reproductions of accessioned records on a self-sustaining basis. NARA does not charge search fees as many other agencies do. However, NARA does require requesters to pay the costs incurred in duplicating these records. Information about the NARA’s fee schedule is located in 36 CFR 1258.

           

          Please note that the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has suspended reproduction and digitization services until further notice due to COVID-19. Orders will not be serviced until operations can resume safely. Once operations resume, document reproduction requests will be filled in the order in which they were received. We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience.

           

          Thank you again for submitting this matter to History Hub!