7 Replies Latest reply on May 26, 2021 9:49 AM by familytreevets

    Searching for war bride records from Europe

    Dona Marc-Borini Newbie

      I am searching for war bride records from Europe, 1946 and significance of the application numbers next to brides' names. My mother was a war bride from Italy. She came over in February 1946 on the Algonquin; I'm seeking information of any records surrounding her arrival.  There is an "application" number assigned to each war bride on the ship's manifest that I would like to locate and understand what it is and what information it has to offer.  Will I need to contact Army archives and if so, how. Thank you.

        • Re: Searching for war bride records from Europe
          familytreevets Wayfarer

          That would be the visa number if it is the column I think you are referring to. If you give me the number, or a link  to the document, I can confirm that for you and tell you how and where to get her specific information.

            • Re: Searching for war bride records from Europe
              Dona Marc-Borini Newbie

              Hello,

              Thank you for responding to my question!!  I do have the number.  It is in the 3rd column of the passenger manifest, "Application No", W 15109.  In the 4th column is "A" which I believe stands for Alien and in the next is a stamp that reads Admitted under Act of Dec. 28, 1945. "PL271". She arrived on the Algonquin on Febr. 22, 1946 in the Port of NY. Do you need any further information?  Thank you so very much.

              Dona

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                • Re: Searching for war bride records from Europe
                  familytreevets Wayfarer

                  Dona,

                  The U.S. Army Transport Service only provided the logistics for the passage to the United States. They will not have any further records. The U. S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will have a specific Alien File (A-file) for your mother. It will have information concerning her admission to the U.S. and any subsequent applications she may have made.

                   

                  The "Application No" W 15109 won't be sufficient for the USCIS to conduce a search for your mom's A-file. A Naturalization Certificate number would likely be sufficient. Her A-file will have an 7 digit number. Either of those will allow you to skip one step in the process of obtaining her file, and avoid the fee and time frame associated with that  first step. See if the family paper records have a 7 digit file number or a Naturalization Certificate.

                   

                  The first step is an application to have an index search conducted by USCIS to identify any records it holds. The second step is an application to actually find the file and copy the contents. Each has a separate fee. I'm going to give you two links for the USCIS that give the details about obtaining the file information. You'll see a distinction made when the person has passed away versus if they are living.

                   

                  http://www.uscis.gov/genealogy

                  http://www.uscis.gov/foia

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              • Re: Searching for war bride records from Europe
                Lauren Theodore Adventurer

                Dear Ms. Marc-Borini,

                 

                Thank you for posting your question on History Hub.

                 

                In additional to the great resources described by the previous poster, you may also wish to request your father's Official Military Personnel File (OMPF). It may include information about his marriage to your mother. OMPFs and individual medical reports for enlisted men of the U.S. Army who were separated from the service after October 1912 and prior to 1958 and for officers of the U.S. Army who were separated from the service after June 1917 and prior to 1958 are in the custody of NARA's National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis. In many cases where personnel records were destroyed in the 1973 fire, proof of service can be provided from other records such as morning reports, payrolls, and military orders, and a certificate of military service will be issued. Please complete a GSA Standard Form 180 and mail it to NARA's National Personnel Records Center, (Military Personnel Records), 1 Archives Drive, St. Louis, MO  63138-1002. You also may fax the form to 314-801-9195. For more information see Official Military Personnel Files (OMPF), Archival Records Requests.

                 

                Also, it is possible that your father filed a Certificate of Witness to Marriage Abroad with the Department of State. You may request a copy of such certificates directly from them.

                 

                We hope this information is helpful in your research.

                 

                Sincerely,

                 

                The National Archives and Records Administration

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