2 Replies Latest reply on May 19, 2021 4:55 PM by Zachary Dabbs

    Why did Japan specifically break a rule in the League of Nations?

    Seamus Ford Newbie

      Why, even though in the League of Nations, did Japan specifically break a rule in the League to not take land from other countries by force?

        • Re: Why did Japan specifically break a rule in the League of Nations?
          Zachary Dabbs Scout

          Dear Seamus Ford,

          Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

          If you have not already done so you should consult Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS). This is a Department of State publication of selected documents from the Department’s files and other sources.  Besides providing the text of the most important documents on U.S. foreign policy, FRUS also provides a source citation printed either as a header with the document or as a footnote). Those references to file numbers or other records identification are the keys to locating not only the printed documents but other documents on the same subject not selected for publication. If you are interested in using any of those records, please contact the National Archives at College Park - Textual Reference (RDT2) via email at archives2reference@nara.gov. FRUS is usually available at large universities or public libraries, and in the  U.S. Government Depository Libraries.

           

          Next, we suggest that you look into records located in the Central Decimal Files, 1910-1963, described here in the National Archives Catalog, in the General Records of the Department of State (Record Group 59), particularly with regard to classes 7 (Political Relations of States) and 8 (Internal Affairs of States) with country code 94 (Japan). Details regarding the Department of State filing system from that time period can also be found in the information pamphlet for NARA microfilm publication M973 “Purport Lists for the Department of State Decimal File 1910-1944.”

           

          Also, when we searched the Catalog we located the series Records and Publications, 1884 - 1953 in Record Group 59 which includes such files as “DS 777.49 U65 1932 Bureau of Far Eastern Affairs. League of Nations Concerning Japan in Manchuria.” We also located the series Captured and Seized Japanese Records, ca. 1947 - ca. 1990 in the National Archives Collection of Foreign Records Seized (Record Group 242), as well as 17 series in the Records of the Office of Strategic Services (Record Group 226), which may include records of interest to your research.

           

          For more information about these records, please contact the National Archives at College Park - Textual Reference (RDT2) at archives2reference@nara.gov.

           

          Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and pursuant to guidance received from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), NARA has adjusted its normal operations to balance the need of completing its mission-critical work while also adhering to the recommended social distancing for the safety of NARA staff. As a result of this re-prioritization of activities, you may experience a delay in receiving an initial acknowledgement as well as a substantive response to your reference request from RDT2. We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience.

           

          Finally, you may find the following online resources useful in your research as well if you have not already reviewed them:

          OSS Records,

          CREST (CIA Records Search Tool), information concerning CREST is provided on the CIA website.

           

          We hope this is helpful. Best of luck with your research!

           

          • Re: Why did Japan specifically break a rule in the League of Nations?
            Zachary Dabbs Scout

            Dear Mr. Ford,

             

            For information on Japanese documentation regarding these events, we suggest that you contact the Military History Department, National Institute for Defense Studies, 2-2-1 Nakameguro, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8648, Japan.

             

            We hope this is helpful.

             

            [information provided by David Langbart, Subject Matter Expert]