3 Replies Latest reply on May 20, 2021 12:31 PM by David Hall

    Seeking regimental records of 10th Vermont Volunteer Infantry

    David Hall Newbie

      How do I obtain Regimental Field and Staff and Company Regimental Returns found in the muster records of the 10th Vermont Volunteer Infantry (Civil War / Union)?  I am doing some research on the role of the 10th Vermont Infantry Regiment during the July 9, 1864 Battle of Monocacy, especially the detail of skirmishers under command of 1st Lt. George E. Davis that fought at the railroad junction on the west side of the Monocacy. I am also generally interested in any memoranda of regimental and company mustering officers to add insight to the operation of the regiment throughout the Civil War. While individual soldier muster records are readily available on-line, Regimental and Field and Staff and Company Returns don't appear to be, or at least I don't how to access them.

        • Re: Seeking regimental records of 10th Vermont Volunteer Infantry
          Elliot Schneider Pioneer

          David,

           

          Please see the following link for information history on the Vermont 10th also contains rosters of enlisted and officers.

           

          https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.$b61793&view=2up&seq=15

          1 person found this helpful
            • Re: Seeking regimental records of 10th Vermont Volunteer Infantry
              David Hall Newbie

              I really appreciate your response. I had already found this Regimental History on-line and it is an excellent reference, although like so many of such accounts written long after the CW we get a lot of the Chaplain's opinions. I read George Davis' and Lew Wallace's Correspondence with him, when Wallace admits he was willing to sacrifice Davis' detachment in order to cover the rest of the Army's retreat route.

               

              I am a resident of Frederick County, Maryland, and the Monocacy Battlefield (actually battlefields if one counts the privately owned north field) is a very special place for me.

               

              I don't know if you have any familiarity with the battlefield or the story related by one of the skirmishers in Davis' detachment - Daniel Freeman - who tells the story of how he barely escaped capture, due to the sacrifice of a "comrade" making a one man stand under the Washington Turnpike bridge over the B&O railroad cut against rebels attacking up the tracks towards the iron railroad bridge over which Davis' men made their precarious retreat. I always thought it should be possible to know who that unknown comrade was, and I think I have figured it out, using the rosters in the regimental history you refer to above and the muster records of the soldiers listed as killed, wounded or captured on July 9, 1864 and after actions reports and accounts of the participants.

               

              I have arrived at my conclusion about his identity, mostly through a process of elimination of the men who were casualties in that fight. By that method it seems quite obvious to me that the man was Private William B. Dutton. However, I want to find some "positive" evidence for my conclusion before I go about attempting to get this hero the recognition he deserves for his self-sacrificial act, perhaps having the current bridge over the railroad cut named after the man.

               

              Davis' company of skirmishers were "picked men", who had demonstrated the field craft skills, marksmanship and ability to operate independently required for this kind of fighting. Every regiment/brigade, infantry and cavalry, had such ad hoc teams for open order fighting sometimes known as Sharpshooters, and the Confederates of Rodes Division even had an officially constituted Sharpshooter Battalion that actually was deployed on the north field of the Monocacy battle. I am hoping by looking at the incidents and itineraries of the 10th Vermont muster records I may be able to find out if its possible to find out what soldiers were "picked men" fighting in Davis' detachment on July 9 and to see if I can positively identify Pvt. Dutton as one of them.

            • Re: Seeking regimental records of 10th Vermont Volunteer Infantry
              Joshua Mason Adventurer

              Good afternoon,

               

              Thank you for posting your question on History Hub!

               

              I'm assuming you are trying to find muster roll returns based on the way you asked your question.  Please keep in mind that in military units during the Civil War there were several different types of returns that were being filled/submitted at different times during the year based on need and then current Army regulations.

               

              A search in the National Archives Catalog and located the series Muster Rolls of Volunteer Organizations During the Civil War, Mexican War, Creek War, Cherokee Removal, and Other Wars, 1836 - 1866 in the Records of the Adjutant General's Office, 1762 - 1917 (Record Group 94) that may have a file for the 10th Vermont Infantry.  This series contains muster rolls, returns, and regimental papers for Volunteer organizations participating in the Civil War, Mexican War, Creek War, and Cherokee Removal.  Rolls for various minor wars are also included.  It contains rolls for units with State designations, Veteran Reserve Corps, U.S. Volunteers, U.S. Colored Troops, deserters, detachments, and Hospital Corps.  There are several types of muster rolls including descriptive rolls, muster-in and muster-out rolls for individuals, detachments, companies, and regiments and for field, staff, and band.  For more information about these non-digitized records, please email the National Archives at Washington, DC - Textual Reference (RDT1) at archives1reference@nara.gov.

               

              Another avenue of approach would be would be to first identify all of the soldiers who served on positions on the regiments field and staff, identify all of the company officers, and to also identify all of the sgt.’s for each company (as sometimes company ordnance, clothing, etc. returns can be found in the Orderly and Ordnance Sgt.’s CMSR's).  Next, using that information you can then request those soldiers' Compiled Military Service Records (CMSR) because the CMSR’s can sometimes contain types of military returns.  These records belong to the Records of the Adjutant General's Office, 1762 - 1917 (Record Group 94).  Some of these records have been digitized and are available using the Catalog.  For more information about the non-digitized records, please email the National Archives at Washington, DC - Textual Reference (RDT1) at archives1reference@nara.gov.

               

              Unfortunately, the records for the 10th Vermont Infantry have not been digitized.  For more information about the non-digitized records, please email the National Archives at Washington, DC - Textual Reference (RDT1) at archives1reference@nara.gov.

               

              Just like in our Catalog, some of these records have been digitized and available to be viewed on the military records website Fold3.  There may be a fee for using Fold3.  Instead, please check for access at your local library as many library systems subscribe to these sites, making them free for their patrons.  In searching Fold3 it appears the CMSR records of the 10th Vermont have been digitized and are available to be viewed.

               

              Another search in the National Archives Catalog and located the series Compiled Records Showing Service of Military Units in Volunteer Union Organizations, 1890 - 1912 in the Records of the Adjutant General's Office, 1762 - 1917 (Record Group 94) that may have a file for the 10th Vermont Infantry.  This series of records documents the actions, activities, and movements of Union volunteer military units that served during the American Civil War.  The records consist of jackets (envelopes) containing cards on which information was copied from original records such as muster rolls and returns.  There are usually individual jackets for each regiment and its field and staff and each company.  The jacket, which is usually entitled "Record of Events" or "Captions and Record of Events," contains cards providing details about unit movements and activities that were recorded on original muster rolls and returns. Some cards provide the captions (titles) of muster-in and muster-out rolls with the certifications by the mustering officers verifying the accuracy of the rolls.  Some cards may simply have administrative information, such as references to another unit with which the unit was merged. Some give day-by-day narratives of a unit's activities while others simply note that the unit was stationed at a certain place during the reporting period (usually two months).  For more information about these non-digitized records, please email the National Archives at Washington, DC - Textual Reference (RDT1) at archives1reference@nara.gov.

               

              In regards to any memoranda of regimental and company mustering officers to add insight to the operation of the regiment throughout the Civil War, we would recommend you research the series Regimental and Company Books of Civil War Volunteer Union Organizations, 1861 - 1867 in the Records of the Adjutant General's Office, 1762 - 1917 (Record Group 94) that include a file unit titled Regimental and Company Books of the 10th Vermont Infantry Regiment.  This series consists of regimental and company record books kept by Union Volunteer units in the field during the Civil War.  Included are letter books, order books, descriptive books, and morning reports.  The series also includes such regimental and company records as clothing books, guard reports, account books, sick reports, court-martial books, and books concerning furloughs and absences.  The extant books for each organization vary.  All of the various kinds of books do not exist for each regiment or company.  For more information about the non-digitized records, please email the National Archives at Washington, DC - Textual Reference (RDT1) at archives1reference@nara.gov.

               

              Please keep in mind that the series Muster Rolls of Volunteer Organizations During the Civil War, Mexican War, Creek War, Cherokee Removal, and Other Wars, 1836 - 1866 also contains regimental papers that could help in regards to finding any memoranda of regimental and company officers that would add insight into the operation of the regiment.

               

              Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and pursuant to guidance received from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), NARA has adjusted its normal operations to balance the need of completing its mission-critical work while also adhering to the recommended social distancing for the safety of NARA staff.  As a result of this re-prioritization of activities, you may experience a delay in receiving an initial acknowledgement as well as a substantive response to your reference request from RDT1.  We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience.

               

              For both Union and Confederate volunteer units raised by states, there may be additional information in the custody of the relevant state archives.  Also, the staff of some Civil War related museums and U.S. state historical societies and museums may be able to assist you with your research.

               

              Many histories have been published about various Civil War units, ranging from books written soon after the war by veterans of the units to works by recent authors.  We suggest searching libraries (to include the Library of Congress and relevant state libraries), retailers, and online sites such as Google Books, the Internet Archive, and HathiTrust.

               

              Please review the Civil War Records: Basic Research Sources from the National Archives, US Civil War: Selected Resources from the Library of Congress, Civil War Research and Commemoration from the U.S. Army Center of Military History, and Beginning United States Civil War Research from FamilySearch. 

               

              Another very helpful resource for regimental research is The Little Regiment article listed in the National Archives Prologue Magazine.

               

              We hope this information is helpful and best of luck with your research!