WW2 bomber downed on the territory of former Yugoslavia

I'm looking for the information about downed USA bomber of WW2 on the territory of the former Yugoslavia (now Bosnia and Herzegovina). I know it was a mission of bombing oil refinery in Ploesti, Romania and I assume it was B24 Liberator. The crew was rescued by Tito's partisans. I even have a photo of the crew with the local population. It was from the summer 1943. And I even have a part of the plane that my late grandfather brought home from the crash site.
I would like to contact one of the descendants of the crew members or donate this part of the plane to one of the American museums.

Parents
  • Thank you for posting your question on History Hub!
     
    Starting in late May 1943, the Army Air Forces required that a missing aircrew report be filed when a crew was lost in combat. During the course of World War II some 16,700 such reports were filed. Most of the reports contain name, rank and service number of crew members; date, place and circumstances of loss; unit to which the crew was assigned; place of origin of the flight; and some details regarding the aircraft itself. Unfortunately, not all losses are documented. If the fate of the crew was established within a few days, a report often was not filed. If a plane was lost due to an accident, a report usually was not filed. And, because it was wartime, there occasionally were lapses in completing even required reports.  

    We searched the National Archives Catalog and located the Missing Air Crew Reports (MACRs), 1942 - 1947 in the Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General (Record Group 92). This series of records may be of interest for your research and include information on the downed bomber. This series has been digitized and is available using the Catalog. If you know the name of the crew members you may want to review the Name Index to the Series Missing Air Crew Reports (MACRs), 1942–1947 to identify the report number associated with the downed bomber. There are additional indexes arranged by tail number and date which have not been digitized. If you are able to identify the plane tail number or specific date of the crash and would like to know more about these non-digitized indexes, please contact the National Archives at College Park - Textual Reference (RR2R) via email at archives2reference@nara.gov.

    The National Archives does not have the present addresses of former service personnel or their survivors on file.  Please review Locating Veterans and Service MembersLocate Military Members, Units, and Facilities and Finding Living People in the United States for information and/or resources to assist you with locating the person you seek.

    We invite you to continue the conversation with community members on History Hub, but should you have follow up questions for the staff at Archives II, please email us at archives2reference@nara.gov so that we can assist you further.

    We hope this assists you with your research!

    Sincerely,

    Textual Reference Archives II Branch (RR2RR)
    [RR2RR 23-55002-SZ]
Reply
  • Thank you for posting your question on History Hub!
     
    Starting in late May 1943, the Army Air Forces required that a missing aircrew report be filed when a crew was lost in combat. During the course of World War II some 16,700 such reports were filed. Most of the reports contain name, rank and service number of crew members; date, place and circumstances of loss; unit to which the crew was assigned; place of origin of the flight; and some details regarding the aircraft itself. Unfortunately, not all losses are documented. If the fate of the crew was established within a few days, a report often was not filed. If a plane was lost due to an accident, a report usually was not filed. And, because it was wartime, there occasionally were lapses in completing even required reports.  

    We searched the National Archives Catalog and located the Missing Air Crew Reports (MACRs), 1942 - 1947 in the Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General (Record Group 92). This series of records may be of interest for your research and include information on the downed bomber. This series has been digitized and is available using the Catalog. If you know the name of the crew members you may want to review the Name Index to the Series Missing Air Crew Reports (MACRs), 1942–1947 to identify the report number associated with the downed bomber. There are additional indexes arranged by tail number and date which have not been digitized. If you are able to identify the plane tail number or specific date of the crash and would like to know more about these non-digitized indexes, please contact the National Archives at College Park - Textual Reference (RR2R) via email at archives2reference@nara.gov.

    The National Archives does not have the present addresses of former service personnel or their survivors on file.  Please review Locating Veterans and Service MembersLocate Military Members, Units, and Facilities and Finding Living People in the United States for information and/or resources to assist you with locating the person you seek.

    We invite you to continue the conversation with community members on History Hub, but should you have follow up questions for the staff at Archives II, please email us at archives2reference@nara.gov so that we can assist you further.

    We hope this assists you with your research!

    Sincerely,

    Textual Reference Archives II Branch (RR2RR)
    [RR2RR 23-55002-SZ]
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