11 Replies Latest reply on Sep 21, 2021 9:47 AM by Alice Lane

    Seeking identification of sashes

    Lou Ward Wayfarer
      I have found a wedding ring from my grandma with a engravement, as well as I have two sashes. Can anyone identify these sashes? Help. The mystery continues. I also have quite a distinguished military family on the "Bach" side from Utrecht Netherlands over the last 250 years. Could they be part of that side of the family possibly?  I have a better picture of Grandpa Newman wearing his banners and sashes from the U.S.A. Thank you to all the 283 people that have viewed my original post there has to be an answer out there somewhere!

        • Re: Seeking identification of sashes
          Alex Daverede Adventurer

          Lou,

           

          The two items in the color images are consistent with elements of U.S. Army uniforms of the mid to late nineteenth century.  The red sash is a fairly common uniform item worn by both officers and senior enlisted personnel.  The sashes could be worn two different ways: around the waist, usually under a sword belt; and across one shoulder.  The sash around the waist is normally a dress uniform item, while the sash across the shoulder may indicate an officer in a duty status such as officer of the day.

           

          The second color item is normally called a lanyard, and it was a feature of U.S. Army uniforms beginning in the 1870’s, when the Army changed its dress uniform regulations to adopt a more Prussian appearance.  These lanyards normally appear in the color of the branch of the wearer—light blue for infantry, red for artillery, yellow for cavalry, etc.  Your example appears to be a faded gold bullion color, which may indicate an officer’s uniform item.  These types of lanyards apparently survived in the Army’s uniform regulations until the first decade of the twentieth century.

           

          The items worn in the b/w photo appear to be non-military in origin, perhaps award in recognition of military service or for a specific event.

           

          I hope you find this information useful in your research.

           

          A. J.

          1 person found this helpful
            • Re: Seeking identification of sashes
              Lou Ward Wayfarer

              Hi Lisa, The sash that is in the photo which unfortunately looks red to us is actually a very burnt orange colour. No tones of red. Do you have any other ideas about what it could be if it was orange? The gold metal one actually may have belonged to my Dutch Great Grandfather and he may have been in the army when it still identified as Prussian. Could we be on to something? I will enclose some more photos as soon as I can. Thank you very much everyone.

              Louise

              Original text


               

              • Re: Seeking identification of sashes
                Lou Ward Wayfarer

                Here is a pic of Great Grandpa on Dutch side in uniform of some sort. Is it possible that both the bright orange sash and gold metal epaulet cord could belong to him in the Dutch Prussian army? Early to mid 1800's? Great Grandpa Bach on Dutch side possibly owner of both Orange and Gold Metal Sashes, does it seem fitting to his garb?

                Original text


                 

                  • Re: Seeking identification of sashes
                    Alex Daverede Adventurer

                    Lou,

                     

                    Your surmise is a distinct possibility.  Both of these uniform accoutrements were common among Western armies in the late nineteenth century.  If the sash is a true orange rather than a faded red, that would definitely be a hallmark of a Royal Netherlands Army officer uniform.  The gold lanyard could still be either a U.S. Army or Royal Netherlands Army uniform item.

                     

                    A. J.

                    1 person found this helpful
                • Re: Seeking identification of sashes
                  Lisa Sharik Scout

                  The ribbon on his jacket is for a Grand Army of the Republic event. See examples attached. The Grand Army of the Republic was a fraternal organization composed of veterans of the Union Army, Union Navy, Marines and the U.S. Revenue Cutter Service who served in the American Civil War. It was founded in 1866.

                  Lisa Sharik

                  Deputy Director

                  Texas Military Forces Museum

                  Grand Army of the Republic MealGrand Army of the Republic event ribbon

                  • Re: Seeking identification of sashes
                    Elliot Schneider Ranger

                    Lou,

                     

                    Can you provide us with more information on the gentleman in the picture? Name, DOB, place of birth?

                     

                     

                     

                    Thanks,

                     

                    Elliot

                      • Re: Seeking identification of sashes
                        Lou Ward Wayfarer

                        Hi Elliot. The gentleman in the photo is my great grandfather and unfortunately I have no idea of his name or age. Wish I did, I think this is the most difficult part. I am pretty sure he is my great grandfather but may actually be my great great grandfather. Possibility that my great grandmother settled down with an older man as she was a young child when apparently she came from Cape Town Africa. No last name. Another brick wall! Thank you to all who may have some ideas for me.

                        Thanks again, Louise

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                        • Re: Seeking identification of sashes
                          Lou Ward Wayfarer

                          The gentleman in the picture is either my great grandfather or his father. The last name is Newman and he was born in either the U.S or England, or Scotland. He is a missing link in my family. A real brick wall. Apparently he was in the U.S at the time of the wars. Which ones or when I cannot seem to find. If he is my great grandfather, he was married to a African lady named Annie, last nee name unknown as she is a double brick wall! I am at a loss. Digging only seems to get more confusing! Help!

                          Yours truly,

                          Louise

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                        • Re: Seeking identification of sashes
                          Alice Lane Pioneer

                          Hi Lou

                          Welcome to History Hub

                          About the photo of your great grandpa

                          Here is the link to a webpage about the photographer that might give you some idea about when the photo was taken.

                          Anton Cornelis Thomann and my grandparents - René van Maarsseveen (renevanmaarsseveen.nl)

                           

                          Alice Lane

                          Research Volunteer