4 Replies Latest reply on Mar 30, 2021 11:37 AM by Charleen Vocca Branched to a new discussion.

    Seeking information about 1930s "She-She-She" camps

    Lauren Turner Newbie

      How can I find information about 1930s "She-She-She" camps established by Eleanor Roosevelt? Where they were? Were they segregated, as their male corollary, the CCCs? How many women of color were reached?

        • Re: Seeking information about 1930s "She-She-She" camps
          Lauren Turner Newbie

          I received an answer to my question. Everything I received only talked about White and African American enrollees in the She-She-She camps. One article I already had said, "There were 90 camps scattered across the country by 1936. Each reflected the different challenges and cultures indigenous to their locations and depended heavily upon available local resources and talent. There were stories of communities cleaning old facilities and donating bedding, clothes, food and other necessities for the women. North Dakota Indian women left their reservation for the first time to attend a camp program." Are there any references to other minority women besides African Americans, their numbers and locations? Did they, including the Native American women referred to above, attend integrated camps, or were they segregated into their own camps?

          • Re: Seeking information about 1930s "She-She-She" camps
            Charleen Vocca Scout

            Dear Ms. Turner,

             

            Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

             

            Although the Federal Emergency Relief Administration and the Works Progress Administration would later set up some "She-She-She" work camps for women, the CCC always remained an organization for men only.

             

            We searched the National Archives Catalog and located 70 series in the Records of the Work Projects Administration (Record Group 69) that pertain to women and including the Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) during the 1930s. For more information, please contact the National Archives at College Park - Textual Reference (RDT2) at archives2reference@nara.gov

             

            We also located the Program Correspondence and Subject Files, 1941 - 1943 in the  Records of the National Youth Administration (Record Group 119) that include unemployed young women. For more information, please contact the National Archives at San Francisco (RW-SB) at sanbruno.archives@nara.gov.

             

            Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and pursuant to guidance received from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), NARA has adjusted its normal operations to balance the need of completing its mission-critical work while also adhering to the recommended social distancing for the safety of NARA staff. As a result of this re-prioritization of activities, you may experience a delay in receiving an initial acknowledgement as well as a substantive response to your reference request from RDT2 and RW-SB. We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience.

             

            We also located 13 photographs in the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library Public Domain Photographs (FDR-PHOCO Collection) that pertain to unemployed women and camps. These photographs are digitized and are available via the Catalog.

             

            We searched the internet and located an article titled New Deal Resident Camps for Unemployed Women. It includes an interactive US map with the locations of known sites for the Women’s Camps. By clicking on the site locations, additional details and sources for each camp is available, such as the number of women who participated, the duration of the program, and possibly if the camp was segregated (for example, see Pine Bluff, AR, Camp Bethune, a camp for African American women). 

             

            The Georgia Historical Society has published an article titled  The National Youth Administration in Georgia: A New Deal for Young Blacks and Women and available from JSTOR but it may be accessed from university libraries.

             

            We hope this is helpful.  Best of luck with your research!

             

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            • Re: Seeking information about 1930s "She-She-She" camps
              LOC Manuscript Division Tracker

              Dear Lauren,

              If you haven't found it already, there is a very useful Story Map on the topic: https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/02050ee5b4d543cf93821f56382367c2 
              The Story Map is an inventory project and initiative of PennPraxis, Stuart Weitzman School of Design, at the University of Pennsylvania. Not only is the project very comprehensive, but has an extensive bibliography that might a great resource for your research!

              Reference Staff
              Manuscript Division
              Library of Congress

              1 person found this helpful
              • Re: Seeking information about 1930s "She-She-She" camps
                Charleen Vocca Scout

                Dear Ms. Turner,

                 

                Thank you for posting your follow-up request on History Hub!

                 

                For more information on the specific records you are seeking, we suggest contacting the National Archives at College Park - Textual Reference (RDT2) at archives2reference@nara.gov

                 

                You also may find the news articles below of interest.  While brief, they mention Camp Capitan in New Mexico, which at one time was a female campsite for predominantly young Latino women: Baca Campground in Raton Ranch and Baca Campground receives historic markers which may provide additional information. 

                 

                We hope this is helpful and best of luck in your research!

                1 person found this helpful