1 5 6 7 8 9 Previous Next 119 Replies Latest reply on Mar 5, 2021 10:38 AM by Henry Rosenberg Go to original post
      • 105. Re: Introduce yourself and meet the crowd.loc.gov community.
        Henry Rosenberg Tracker

        Welcome Pete. This is a great project and I'm sure LOC will be happy to have your input. FYI, I was one of the first Vietnam era people to get a high draft number but not be drafted. I was draft eligible the last 2 years of the draft but they ended it before I could ger drafted. My # was in the 40's. I guess we were on opposite sides of the same fence. Thank you for your service.

        Henry

        • 106. Re: Introduce yourself and meet the crowd.loc.gov community.
          Lauren Algee Scout

          Hi Peter!

           

          Welcome!  Jumping in to respond to your interest in AI.  Automated transcription software is known in the field as HTR (Handwriting Text Recognition).  We don't use it yet for a number of reasons, including the desire to engage the public with our collections to democratize the creation of knowledge, as well as HTR technical limitations.  Currently a very large training data set of a consistent hand is required to get a high level of accuracy for a specific writer, which we don't have yet.  But it's possible that the volunteer-generated transcriptions you're making today could help train handwriting transcription software for us in the future!

           

          The Library is beginning to experiment with machine learning to enhance our collections in a few ways -- here are two examples: https://blogs.loc.gov/thesignal/2020/05/innovator-ben-lee-and-lc-labs-host-data-jam-with-100-million-historic-newspaper-…

          https://blogs.loc.gov/thesignal/2019/09/summer-of-machine-learning-collaboration-with-the-university-of-nebraska-lincoln…

           

          Best,

          Lauren (BTP Community Manager)

          2 people found this helpful
          • 107. Re: Introduce yourself and meet the crowd.loc.gov community.
            Phillip Bussey Wayfarer

            Hi All,

             

            It looks like I might be a few years late to this party, but my background is that I'm an Annapolis resident, recently retired, and I've had an interest in archived material of many kinds, particularly military history, for many years. I've followed the interest since retirement to the point where I now write a weekly commo on the topic that goes to a limited audience, with the topics based in part on my own research.

             

            My background in research includes a Ph.D. from the U of MD in one of the behavioral sciences, done at the same time I was working, so with regret I never got to meet any of the really great historians who were at the U. of MD while I was there. I did, though, learn what it took to do good research, a skill that certainly generalizes between professions, just as usable in one field as another if supplemented by a little study.

             

            I had a great chum, a national expert on maps and similar things, who introduced me to what a wonderful resource the LOC was and what one could do with its information.

             

            On a different level I was interested to see information on the Harris & Ewing photo collection, a company which I know of from another hobby, photography, and a group which took a few great photos of my children before they eventually closed up. It's great to hear that their collection of images and negatives were preserved.

             

            That's it!  Feel free to let me know if I can help any of 'you all' out on your projects if it's close to my areas of interest. I can be reached at philbussey@mac.com.

             

            Best,

             

            Phil

            1 person found this helpful
            • 108. Re: Introduce yourself and meet the crowd.loc.gov community.
              Sharon McKinley Adventurer

              Phil;

                How could you be late? This only started 2 years ago, with a very limited set of collections. They keep adding new ones. And who knows, you may find yourself interested in women's suffrage, or Teddy Roosevelt, or or or. These collections are absolutely fascinating. And if they're not--you don't have to do them! Go check them out. Try somethhing new and see!!

               

              Sharon McKinley

              1 person found this helpful
              • 109. Re: Introduce yourself and meet the crowd.loc.gov community.
                Henry Rosenberg Tracker

                Hi Phil- I have been doing this from the beginning but you know what? There is so much to do and will be much to do for years to come. At some point you will be one of the"old" guys.

                Welcome to the site and I hope you enjoy it. BTW, I originally wanted to work on "Letters to Lincoln" but it was so poular I decided to find other areas. I chose Mary Church Terrell who I had never heard of but worked on her work until there was nothing left to do. Currently, I am working in Anna Dickinson,again, someone I never heard of. I like deciphering handwriting which I find younger people have trouble with so that may be an area you can help with. In any event, I hope you pick something, dive in and enjoy.

                 

                Best wishes,

                Henry

                • 110. Re: Introduce yourself and meet the crowd.loc.gov community.
                  Ann Thiel Newbie

                  I was a volunteer transcriber for the Boston Public Library (via Zooinverse). I transcribed 1309 Anti-slavery Manuscripts from the 1840s - 1870s during my 18 months as a volunteer. This project was completed on August 12, 2020, and I was looking for another transcription project. After some searching, I found History Hub and the Library of Congress "By the People Campaigns". I'm so glad I did! I've decided to transcribe "Suffrage: Women Fight for the Vote" as it is a wonderful  transition from the Anti-slavery Manuscripts. Women suffragists were involved in the Anti-slavery movement, so their names are quite familiar to me, and I transcribed some of their manuscripts. My work on the Anti-slavery Manuscripts provides me with a familiarity of that period in history which I believe will greatly enhance my efforts in transcribing Women's Suffrage manuscripts. Thank you for the opportunity! 

                  1 person found this helpful
                  • 111. Re: Introduce yourself and meet the crowd.loc.gov community.
                    Henry Rosenberg Tracker

                    Welcome Ann- I'm sure your experience will be invaluable. If you have any tips, please post them. Depending on which you prefer,typewritten or handwritten pages, I'm sure you will find plenty to do.

                     

                    Best wishes,

                    Henry

                    • 112. Re: Introduce yourself and meet the crowd.loc.gov community.
                      Charles Trentelman Wayfarer

                      Hi there...I"m Charles Trentelman, 72, living in Ogden, Utah.  I am a retired newspaper reporter and columnist and have a massive interest in history, photography and other related things. I've worked as a volunteer at local museums and libraries since retirement.

                       

                      My wife told me about the LOC project to transcribe documents because of my love of history, the fact that retired people are bored out of their skulls during Covid, and because of a recent interest in reviving my cursive penmanship skills in an effort to keep up with my 10-year-old granddaughter.

                       

                      As a result I'm enjoying transcribing hand-written letters. It's both challenging and enjoyable and helps my own cursive skills. I'm able to apply my research skills to get the proper spelling of names of people who worked with Teddy Roosevelt, for example, and who doesn't love reading other people's mail?

                       

                      If I have one tip to folks doing cursive it would be to just scan through the whole thing first, picking out words you can read easily and studying how that writer makes particular letters.  This helps a lot translating what look like random squiggles into the letter S, for example, or whatever.

                       

                      So here I am.  Nice to meet you all.

                      2 people found this helpful
                      • 113. Re: Introduce yourself and meet the crowd.loc.gov community.
                        Henry Rosenberg Tracker

                        Hi Charles-Welcome. I agree with your approach to transcribing. I tend to write what I can and leave the words I do not recognize immediately with a [?] and go back after I have finished what I could do. Many times you can figure out the context after most of the words are filled in and as you suggest you may see a word or letter in a different word that gives you a clue to the ones you are having trouble with. And again you are correct that each person has a distinctive style with writing. Sometimes it takes a few days before you recognize the quirks.

                        Again, welcome and I hope you enjoy this as much as I have.

                         

                        Henry

                        • 114. Re: Introduce yourself and meet the crowd.loc.gov community.
                          Abigail Shelton Newbie

                          Hi everyone, As the newest Community Manager for By the People, I wanted to introduce myself! I’m really looking forward to getting to know you all on History Hub and helping you in any way I can.

                           

                          Now a little about me-I’m originally from Buffalo, NY (hello winter!) but I currently live in Northern Indiana (also hello to winter!), and have a background in Early American women’s history, and libraries/archives. Before coming to the Library of Congress, I worked on digital collections at the University of Notre Dame. I was first introduced to transcription projects a few years ago and am excited to work with you all to help make the Library’s collections more accessible to a wider group of people.

                           

                          Feel free to introduce yourself in the thread below-would love to hear about some of your greatest finds from the Library’s collections. And if like me, you’re new to the By the People initiative, I look forward to learning alongside you!

                          1 person found this helpful
                          • 115. Re: Introduce yourself and meet the crowd.loc.gov community.
                            Henry Rosenberg Tracker

                            Hello Abigail- Welcome!

                            One of my interesting finds was Mary Church Terrell's library card from The Library of Congress. Also, some of her experiences with racism like the time on a D.C. trolley, when someone called her the "N" word and she got in his face.

                            I look forward to working with you.

                             

                            Henry

                            • 116. Re: Introduce yourself and meet the crowd.loc.gov community.
                              Abigail Shelton Newbie

                              Hi Henry,

                               

                              Glad to meet you! Thanks for sharing about Mary Church Terrell's library card and the racism she faced in the city. I didn't know much about her before starting at the Library and I'm looking forward to learning more.

                               

                              Abby

                              1 person found this helpful
                              • 117. Re: Introduce yourself and meet the crowd.loc.gov community.
                                Charles Trentelman Wayfarer

                                Hey Ms. Shelton,

                                 

                                Glad to meet you. I'm new here as well a retired newspaperman and former paid snoop now having a ball transcribing and reading all of the letters to Teddy Roosevelt.  Just did a letter from a newspaper official who was asking Teddy for the stuffed head of something Teddy killed to hang on the wall of the local Republican Club, a request I found rather odd even for the day and age. He wasn't even picky about what it was Teddy killed, so I'm curious now to find out what, if anything, Teddy sent - a bison?  A mouse? The mysterious Jackalope (that gag had to start somewhere.)

                                 

                                So enjoy -- history is great fun.

                                 

                                Charlie Trentelman

                                Ogden, Utah

                                1 person found this helpful
                                • 118. Re: Introduce yourself and meet the crowd.loc.gov community.
                                  Henry Rosenberg Tracker

                                  Before Covid, one of my volunteer experiences was at The National Museum of Natural History. We were given a tour of the specimen room and one of the items they showed us was the head of a bear that TR was supposed to have shot. The truth was the bear was set up by others for TR to shoot but he refused because it wasn;t sporting.

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