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4 Posts authored by: Rachael Salyer Expert

Are you researching a topic related to environmental studies? If so, you can find many useful resources among these collections at the National Archives. Listed here are some of the many record groups that provide information about environmental issues.

 

 

Many state, local, and private archives also contain records that document important information about the environment. The National Archives’ National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) has provided grants to several such institutions, and the collections those organizations have digitized are now freely available online. Two examples include:

 

  • The Aldo Leopold Foundation and the University Archives of the University of Wisconsin, Madison have digitized the papers of 20th century ecologist and philosopher Aldo Leopold. As they note on their website, “Aldo Leopold is considered by many to have been the most influential conservation thinker of the 20th Century. Leopold’s legacy spans the disciplines of forestry, wildlife management, conservation biology, sustainable agriculture, restoration ecology, private land management, environmental history, literature, education, esthetics, and ethics. He is most widely known as the author of A Sand County Almanac, one of the most beloved and respected books about the environment ever published. The Leopold Collection houses the raw materials that document not only Leopold’s rise to prominence but the history of conservation and the emergence of the field of ecology from the early 1900s until his death in 1948.” You can view the collection and find out more about Aldo Leopold here: Aldo Leopold Archives – UW Digital Collections

 

  • The University of Florida has digitized material several “archival collections related to the exploration, development, and conservation of the Everglades between 1879-1929. These collections include materials from two Florida governors who wanted to develop the swampy region, a governor's wife who advocated conservation of certain regions, and several individuals associated with development. Together, the approximately 100,000 pages in the collections document the vibrant turn-of-the-century debate about what to do with these lands that appeared useless and dangerous.” To browse the collection, visit: UFDC Home - America's Swamp: the Historical Everglades 

 

For more information about other NHPRC digitization grant projects, see:

Are you researching a topic related to business, trade, patents, advertising, etc.? If so, then you’ll find many useful resources at the National Archives. Some of our record groups and series that relate to these topics include:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beyond the available federal records, though, there may be records held at the state or local level or held at a private institution that prove useful to your research. The National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) | National Archives https://www.archives.gov/nhprc has awarded digitization grants to several organizations across the United States that hold such records, and many of those digital collections are available online for researchers to use freely.

 

Here are some of the digital collections related to business, trade, patents, and advertising in America that were made possible by NHPRC grant funding:

 

  • The California State Archives has digitized its collection of “Trademark Registrations and Specimens, Old Series, 1861-1900.” Some examples from the collection include: “Levi Strauss & Co. jeans, early California wineries' bottle labels, Kentucky bourbon distilleries labels, 19th century medicines and tonics, and the original trademark registered to Anheuser Busch for its Budweiser lager.” To read more about the project and to browse the scanned images, visit their website: http://www.sos.ca.gov/archives/trademarks/

 

  • The Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History (AARL), which is part of the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System (AFPLS) worked with the Digital Library of Georgia (DLG), in order to digitize some of their collections that “document the role of African Americans in the development of educational institutions during a pivotal time in the history of race relations in the United States (1860 - 1950).” The records are primarily organizational and personal papers, and include advertisements, articles, broadsides, catalogs, ephemera, invitations, journals, leaflets, correspondence, photographs, and programs.” To find out more, visit their website: http://www.afpls.org/aarl

 

  • Duke University digitized thousands of photographs and slides to add to their ROAD (Resource of Outdoor Advertising Description) database. The images are primarily of billboards, and they “document changes not only in advertising but also in the American landscape.” Check out the collection here: http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/outdooradvertising/

 

 

 

For more information about digital projects funded by the NHPRC's digitization grants, see these posts:

Records about American Cities - Digitization Projects Funded by the NHPRC

Civil War Records - Digitization Projects Supported by the NHPRC

Digitization Projects Made Possible by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC)

Are you looking for records about the history of housing, lending, and development in American cities? The National Archives hold many records related these issues, and you can find valuable information in a number of our record groups, including:

 

 

In addition to researching federal records, you might also want to research on the state or local level, and many institutions hold collections about individual cities or regions. The National Archives’ National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC - https://www.archives.gov/nhprc) has awarded digitization grants to several organizations across the United States that hold such records, and many of those digital collections are available online for researchers to use.

 

Here are some of the digital collections related to the development of urban areas in America that were made possible by NHPRC grant funding:

 

  • The Law Library of Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, has digitized the Mt. Laurel cases, a collection of legal documents related to a series of cases on affordable housing in New Jersey, and they have also digitized “reports and extensive hearing transcripts of the Lilley Commission, a state commission formed to examine the causes of the civil disorders in Newark and other New Jersey cities in 1967.” Find out more at these sites:

http://njdll.rutgers.edu/handle/123456789/128

http://njdll.rutgers.edu/handle/123456789/1

 

  • The Getty Research Institute has digitized two collections of photographs that “document the growth of housing and urban development in California and the Midwest from 1936 until 1997.” The collections include the Leonard Nadel Papers (Nadel photographed the workers of the Bracero Program) and the Julius Shulman Photography Archive (Shulman is best known for his architectural photographs). Learn more about this digitization project here:

http://www.getty.edu/research/tools/digital_collections/notable/nadel.html

http://www.getty.edu/research/tools/guides_bibliographies/shulman/

 

  • The University Library Special Collections Department at the University of Illinois, Chicago has digitized “photographs of historic Chicago sites, streets, neighborhoods and buildings” from its James S. Parker collection (Parker owned a commercial photography firm in Chicago and managed legal photography for the city) and the Chicago Photographic collection, which “depicts nearly all of Chicago's neighborhoods over several decades, serving as a significant temporal and pictorial documentation of the many changes in Chicago's urban landscape, built environment, and industrial economy, especially during the mid 20th century.” You can find out more at their website: http://collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/uic_pic

 

For more information about digital projects funded by the NHPRC's digitization grants, see these posts:

Digitization Projects Made Possible by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC)

Civil War Records - Digitization Projects Supported by the NHPRC

Did you know that as part of its mission to “promote[] the preservation and use of America’s documentary heritage,” the National Archives’ National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC - https://www.archives.gov/nhprc) has awarded digitization grants to institutions across the United States? Many of those institutions have made their digital collections freely available to the public, and they cover a wide range of topics, including the Civil War, environmental activism, social welfare, civil rights, agriculture, advertising, and much more!

 

Here are just a few examples of the variety of digitization projects made possible by the NHPRC:

 

  • The University of Tennessee at Knoxville digitized its collection of interviews conducted with veterans of World War II. The oral histories can be found here: http://digital.lib.utk.edu/collections/wwiioralhistories
  • The University of Iowa digitized its Henry A. Wallace collection. Wallace served as the Secretary of Agriculture from 1933-1950, as the Vice President from 1941-1945, and as the Secretary of Commerce from 1945-1946. You can view this collection here: http://wallace.lib.uiowa.edu/

 

  • The Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, which is part of the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System, worked with the Digital Library of Georgia “to  digitize and make Web-accessible late nineteenth and mid-twentieth century manuscript collections that document the historical development of education for African Americans, primarily in the South, from the early 1860s to the early 1950s.” Check out their collections here: http://www.afpls.org/aarl

 

  • The Aldo Leopold Foundation and the University of Wisconsin at Madison digitized their Aldo Leopold collection. Leopold, the author of A Sand County Almanac (1949) was--among other things--an American environmentalist and forester. You can view the collection here: https://uwdc.library.wisc.edu/collections/aldoleopold/

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