I just found this looking through old correspondence, today.
Dear Ms. W:
This is in reply to your letter asking for information about the identity tags you and your family were required to wear in 1930s to 1940 or so. You said they were a little larger than a quarter, and had your name and identity numbers 3234 and 1136, and Tulsa, Oklahoma written on them.  You said they identified you as an Indian, and you wanted to know why President Roosevelt issued them and to what particular Indians. You said you understood they were welfare tags the WPA was to use to provide you with food and schooling. You said a local historian told you they were issued when your family was moved away from the river. You said you wore them in several schools.You said they were a source of discrimination because they identified you as an Indian. You said you would like to know if they identified you as to tribe.  I have searched the Bureau of Indian Affairs records in our custody and have not found anything yet about these tags.  If I should find out anything in the future, I will try to get back to you with the information. In the meantime, I am sending your letter over to our other building where they have the WPA records, to see if they know anything, and they will answer you separately.

Dear Ms W:
This is in reply to your second letter asking for information about the identity tags you and your family were required to wear in 1930s to 1940 or so.  I have continued to look in the Bureau of Indian Affairs records and still have found nothing about identity tags as you described them.  I have found out that there was a program under President Roosevelt called the Indian Relief and Rehabilitation program, and it was associated with the WPA. The purpose of the program was to provide for basic needs, and to help Indians become more self-sustaining, so it could have been the program you were talking about.  You said it was a Welfare Act.  You said you had a lady in Dawson, Oklahoma, who took care of your needs. There were identification cards issued to individual workers who were hired to do projects under this IRR program, such as renovation of housing, digging wells, canning fruits and vegetables, sewing, and so on. The numbers on these ID cards were supposed to be the number of the project and the consecutive number of the person hired.  If someone was working on a project for the Five Civilized Tribes, their project number was 5- 274.  If someone were the 123rd person hired, their number would be 274-123.  The ID numbers were supposed to stay with the person even if they transferred to another project.  But there was no mention of any identification tags.  This is still a mystery.