I would like to find out when my grandmother was naturalized?

My grandmother, Leonarda Salerno Linsalata, immigrated to the US in 1903 at 12 years old. Linsalata is her married name.  If she wasn’t naturalized until after my mother was born, 1925, then I can get my Italian citizenship. How do I prove that she wasn’t naturalized until after 1925?

thank you,

Andria 

Parents
  •  

    Thank you for using the History Hub!

    Prior to 1922, the nationality of married women was tied to their husbands. If the husband of a foreign-born woman became a naturalized U.S. citizen, then his naturalization paperwork and subsequent U.S. citizenship extended to her; she did not have her own naturalization paperwork. If an American-born woman married a non-U.S. citizen, then she lost her U.S. citizenship and assumed his nationality instead. Thus, married women are not represented equally in pre-1922 U.S. naturalization records.

    Congress passed a law in 1922 that gave married women a nationality of their own, regardless of their marital status. Thereafter, married women had to file their own paperwork to become naturalized U.S. citizens. More information on women and naturalization can be found at: http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/1998/summer/women-and-naturalization-1.html.

    For information regarding naturalizations occurring after 1906, you should contact the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) directly. That agency has a copy of each certificate of naturalization issued after 1906. They are referred to as C-files. The USCIS Form G-639, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Request, is available online at https://www.uscis.gov/g-639.

    We hope this assists you with your research!


    Sincerely,


    Archives 1 Reference Branch (RR1R)

    [RR1R-24-31824-KS]


Reply
  •  

    Thank you for using the History Hub!

    Prior to 1922, the nationality of married women was tied to their husbands. If the husband of a foreign-born woman became a naturalized U.S. citizen, then his naturalization paperwork and subsequent U.S. citizenship extended to her; she did not have her own naturalization paperwork. If an American-born woman married a non-U.S. citizen, then she lost her U.S. citizenship and assumed his nationality instead. Thus, married women are not represented equally in pre-1922 U.S. naturalization records.

    Congress passed a law in 1922 that gave married women a nationality of their own, regardless of their marital status. Thereafter, married women had to file their own paperwork to become naturalized U.S. citizens. More information on women and naturalization can be found at: http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/1998/summer/women-and-naturalization-1.html.

    For information regarding naturalizations occurring after 1906, you should contact the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) directly. That agency has a copy of each certificate of naturalization issued after 1906. They are referred to as C-files. The USCIS Form G-639, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Request, is available online at https://www.uscis.gov/g-639.

    We hope this assists you with your research!


    Sincerely,


    Archives 1 Reference Branch (RR1R)

    [RR1R-24-31824-KS]


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