I am trying to find out about a distant relative Kazimierz Polewko who was in Wejmar-Buchenwald, prisoner number: 42465, Block 17

I am trying to find out about a distant relative Kazimierz Polewko who was in Wejmar-Buchenwald, prisoner number: 42465, Block 17

I also had family members Jan Polewko in Stutthof concentration camp his prisoner numbers was 33414 and Stanislaw Polewko in Stutthof as well.

His prisoner number was 19948.

I really want to learn what happened to Kazimierz Polewko after the war and who his parents were. I kinda think he did not survive.

He is mentioned in family letters in my possession from 1947.

I think his mother was Marjanna but I am not sure.

My sister and I are researching our Polish Ancestry and we want to lear everything we can about the Polewko family.

Our Grandfather Joseph was born in Thomas West Virginia when his father Jan was working we think in the mines on a work visa.

My Grandfathers other two brothers Jan and Antoni were also born in Thomas West Virginia.

They all moved back to Poland at some time which we do not know either. 

From the family letters we think they were from Jurasze Poland.

Paul

  • I am trying to find out about a distant relative Kazimierz Polewko who was in Wejmar-Buchenwald, prisoner number: 42465, Block 17

    I also had family members Jan Polewko in Stutthof concentration camp his prisoner numbers was 33414 and Stanislaw Polewko in Stutthof as well.

    His prisoner number was 19948.

    I really want to learn what happened to Kazimierz Polewko after the war and who his parents were. I kinda think he did not survive.

    He is mentioned in family letters in my possession from 1947.

    I think his mother was Marjanna but I am not sure.

    My sister and I are researching our Polish Ancestry and we want to lear everything we can about the Polewko family.

    Our Grandfather Joseph was born in Thomas West Virginia when his father Jan was working we think in the mines on a work visa.

    My Grandfathers other two brothers Jan and Antoni were also born in Thomas West Virginia.

    They all moved back to Poland at some time which we do not know either. 

    From the family letters we think they were from Jurasze Poland.

    Paul

  •  

    Thank you for posting your inquiry on History Hub!

    We have searched records located in the series titled Concentration Camp Buchenwald Entry Register, 1945 in the National Archives Collection of World War II War Crimes Records (Record Group 238). We located an entry for Mr. Kazimierz Polewko. Please note that these records have not been digitized. They may be viewed in the Textual Research Room at the National Archives at College Park, MD. To request copies of these records please send your request to archives2reference@nara.gov so that we can assist you further.

    We also searched records located in the series titled Lists and Registers of German Concentration Camp Inmates (Microfilm Publication A3355) in the National Archives Collection of Foreign Records Seized (Record Group 242). We located a card for Kazimierz Polewko (image 1335) in the file unit titled Camp Records - Inmate Cards - Buchenwald - Records on Prisoners, Plat-Pow. Please note that these records have been digitized and may be viewed using the Catalog.

    In addition, we searched digitized records available on the website of the Arolsen Archives for any records on Kazimierz Polewko. The search results may be viewed here.

    Further, you may also want to contact the Buchenwald Memorial and the Archive of the Institute of National Remembrance as they may be able to assist you with your family research.

    Next, we searched the Catalog for any records relating to Joseph Polewko, Jan Polewko, and Antoni Polewko. The search results may be viewed here. Please note that these records have been digitized and may be viewed using the Catalog.

    Finally, we would suggest reviewing records available via ancestry.com for any references to your relatives. There is usually a fee for these services. You may also view these digital records online at one of NARA's facilities for free via the Archives Library Information Center (ALIC). A list of our facilities is available on our Visit Us webpage. Additionally, you may check with your local public library or university library as these institutions often provide access to websites such as Ancestry.com.

    We invite you to continue the conversation with community members on History Hub, but should you have follow up questions for the staff at Archives II, please email us at archives2reference@nara.gov so that we can assist you further. 

    We hope this assists you with your research! 

    Sincerely,

    Textual Reference Archives II Branch (RR2RR)

    [RR2RR 24-36133-SN]

  • After Kazimierz’s stay in Buchenwald, he seems to end up in Concentration Camp Mittelbau (Dora).
    His final mention is in early December 1944 when he gets treatment for a fractured “radii” (possibly his radius?). 
    He was born on 27 Dec 1923 in Juraszy/Juraszyn/Jurasziu. This is probably Jurasze in Gmina Sidra, Sokółka County, Podlaskie Voivodeship.  I can’t find a death for him, so most likely he survived WW2. Maybe he went back to Berlin where he had been living before being sent to the camps?

    His mother is indeed mentioned as Marian(n)a. It is probably a total coincidence but in 1905 the following marriage takes place:
    Groom: Adam Polewko (son of
    Michał & Justyna Zieziula)
    Bride: Marianna Bielawska (daughter of Aleksander& Karolina Niemkuć)
    Marriage: 22 Nov 1905 “Miejscowość Jurasze Czepiele” (=The town of Jurasze Czepiele)
    Source:
    Civil status files of the Roman Catholic Parish in Kuźnica
    Image:
    https://www.szukajwarchiwach.gov.pl/skan/-/skan/0211a694bf7860cb04dbb4b94b0a242b7c9fd796490e3fce5a5638468cd53af7  (#36 - Top right)


    I noticed that your great grandfather might have arrived in 1905:
    - departure:
    https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSG9-8SDC-F?i=153 (right page, 4 from bottom)
    - arrival New York -
    https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-G1XS-RRJ?i=399 (#11)
    Apparently he was from Grodno (Hrodna in Belarus). Even though it is in another country nowadays, it is not very far from Jurasze.

    The family is still in West Virginia in the 1910 census (
    https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YBC-JYH?i=22  (#14)), but by 1930 Josef returns from Europe: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-95HW-DB5?i=417 (#2). His contact is an uncle from his mother’s side, so most likely there are no close Polewko relatives left in the US by then.



  • Stanislaw b 25 May 1915 “Jurasew’, died on 3 April 1943 in Stutthof Concentration Camp.
    He wasn’t married and had at least a brother called Ignatzy.
    His parents were Jan Polewko (apparently died in 1922) and Katharina Balakierow (died 1922 as well)
    Stanislaw’s DC:
    https://collections.arolsen-archives.org/en/document/4406560

    FYI Could these be his military details?:
    https://wbh.wp.mil.pl/pl/skanydetale_wyszukiwarka_bazy_personalne/206175/


  • https://collections.arolsen-archives.org/en/document/2909473 to: https://collections.arolsen-archives.org/en/document/2909489 contain multiple cards for Kazimierz in Mittelbau. Most of it contains him arriving in Mittelbau, going to the hospital for his broken bone and being dismissed from hospital.

    However, I believe that it also contains that what you are looking for:

    https://collections.arolsen-archives.org/en/document/2909475 tells us that he was sent to “Erich” mid Dec 1944 (i.e. shortly after leaving hospital). (FYI: https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/article/mittelbau-main-camp-in-depth )

    https://collections.arolsen-archives.org/en/document/2909474 seems to say that he died in Erich on 3-3-1945.
    A few days later his cremation was documented: https://collections.arolsen-archives.org/en/document/2909477


  • Sylvia, first off thank you so very much for replying to my query. And thank you for your work on this information.

    Can I ask you where you are living right now and what your heritage is? Are you Polish? I assume you read, write and, speak Polish?

    I am 61 and live in Seattle Washington. I am originally from Chicago Illinois. I moved to Seattle in 2001.

    How can you be sure Stanislaw, my Grandfather Joesph's brother died in Stutthof?

    I have many family letters and he is in them as of 1947.

    I have a million questions about our Polish family history and I hope you can help fill in many more blanks regarding this.

    Again, thank you so much Sylvia.

    Sincerely,

    Paul Polewko


  • I have no links to Poland and don’t know Polish (although I am starting to recognize words) and even less Russian with that complicated Cyrillic script (used in most of the documents encountered here), but with a bit of logic and Google translate I can recognize just enough to find a few things. I can read a little bit of German, so those documents are a bit easier to identify.

    Now back to Stanislaw:
    You mentioned a Stanislaw with prisoner number # 19948. A Stanislaw with this number was born 25 May 1915 and was held in Camp Stutthof: https://collections-server.arolsen-archives.org/G/SIMS/01014102/0127/97244253/001.jpg  
    The DC that I mentioned contains same that birth date i.e. he died on 25 May 1945 in Stutthoff.
    =>
    Your grandfather Joseph’s mother seems to have been Amelia Ziczula/Zegula (or something like that), while this Stanislaw’s mother was Katharina Balakierow.  If Amelia died somewhere between 1910 (US census) and 1914, I suppose that it is possible that Joseph and Stanislaw were half brothers, but they could have been related in some other way too i.e. maybe this is not the Stanislaw you are looking for.

  • Typo! Of course it should have been: he died on 3 April 1943 in Stutthof”

  • Sylvia, 

    First off,I don’t think our relative Stanislaw was ever in a camp after reviewing family letters again.
    Sorry for my confusion, there is just so much data to read through.
    Here is some of our Polish family tree.
    My Grandfather Joseph Polewko, his bother Antoni and Jan were all born in Thomas West Viginia.
    Their father Jan Polewko came to United States in 1905, his wife’s name was Emelia nee: Zieziula. Jan worked as a coal miner there.
    They had a son Bronislaus and maybe a daughter Borona born 1906.
    Maybe they were twins? We have a ledger entry from the Catholic Diocese in West Virginia showing a Bronislaus being baptized. And in the 1910 census they list a daughter Borona being born the same year.
    We don't think they survived as there is zero information about them in any of the family letters we have in our possession.
    Joseph was born in 1908, Antoni in 1910, and Jan in 1912.
    They all went back to Poland and a sister Anna was born in Poland in 1914.
    Their mother Emilia died that same year.
    Jan remarried in 1915 to Marianna nee: Nowik.
    They had son's Stanislaw, Kazimierz and a daughter Maria.
    During the war I now see in family letters that Stanislaw was in the war according to his mother Marianna.
    Maria, Anna and Kazimierz were deported to forced labor in Germany.
    Kazimierz was in Wejmar-Buchenwald, and also Mittelbau. 
    As late as 1948 in a letter from his mother she sates there is no news on his whereabouts and they think he must have been killed.
    In a letter from Jan jr. from 1947 he says he was taken by the Germans to a concentration camp in 1942.
    He was released by the Americans on April 12th 1945.
    I have two prisoner card files I found in the Arolsen archives for Jan jr. One from Buchenwald, prisoner #50639  and one from Stutthof, prisoner #33414 and both show a birth date of April the 8th 1912
    Both list him as having a wife named Irena.
    I never hear her mentioned in the family letters by him after the war.
    Antoni was taken to the army durning the Bolshevik invasion of Poland in 1944 (I assume this means the Russians?).
    My grandfather Joseph immigrated back to the United States in 1930.
    After the war Jan, and Antoni are trying desperately to get documents stating that they were born in th eUSA so they can emigrate to the USA.
    I have around 77 letters from my Polish relatives that were in my Granfathers possessions that we have inherited.
    All of these letters are from right after the war up until 1989.
    Most all of them describe brutal living conditions and a very hard life at best.
    Sylvia, are you an American?
    And can you tell me your background related to History HUB and why you helping me and I assume other people out?
    My younger sister and I are doing some intensive family research and building family tree.
    We are trying very hard to make contact with Polish Polewko family members we are directly related too with the hope of making contact and possibly visiting in the future.
    We are also German, Swiss and, French and a few other things as most Americans are.
    Thank you so much for the information you have given to us so far.
    Sincerely,
    Paul Polewko
  • Sylvia, this is very sad news to learn about Kazimierz. Thank you so much for finding these documents so we can close this chapter on one of our Polish relatives. 

    We are still trying to make contact with any living Polewko's in Poland and its is proving very difficult.

    Do you have any tips you can pass along that can help us achieve this end?

    Sincerely, 

    Paul Polewko