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2017

Are you researching a topic related to business, trade, patents, advertising, etc.? If so, then you’ll find many useful resources at the National Archives. Some of our record groups and series that relate to these topics include:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beyond the available federal records, though, there may be records held at the state or local level or held at a private institution that prove useful to your research. The National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) | National Archives https://www.archives.gov/nhprc has awarded digitization grants to several organizations across the United States that hold such records, and many of those digital collections are available online for researchers to use freely.

 

Here are some of the digital collections related to business, trade, patents, and advertising in America that were made possible by NHPRC grant funding:

 

  • The California State Archives has digitized its collection of “Trademark Registrations and Specimens, Old Series, 1861-1900.” Some examples from the collection include: “Levi Strauss & Co. jeans, early California wineries' bottle labels, Kentucky bourbon distilleries labels, 19th century medicines and tonics, and the original trademark registered to Anheuser Busch for its Budweiser lager.” To read more about the project and to browse the scanned images, visit their website: http://www.sos.ca.gov/archives/trademarks/

 

  • The Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History (AARL), which is part of the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System (AFPLS) worked with the Digital Library of Georgia (DLG), in order to digitize some of their collections that “document the role of African Americans in the development of educational institutions during a pivotal time in the history of race relations in the United States (1860 - 1950).” The records are primarily organizational and personal papers, and include advertisements, articles, broadsides, catalogs, ephemera, invitations, journals, leaflets, correspondence, photographs, and programs.” To find out more, visit their website: http://www.afpls.org/aarl

 

  • Duke University digitized thousands of photographs and slides to add to their ROAD (Resource of Outdoor Advertising Description) database. The images are primarily of billboards, and they “document changes not only in advertising but also in the American landscape.” Check out the collection here: http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/outdooradvertising/

 

 

 

For more information about digital projects funded by the NHPRC's digitization grants, see these posts:

Records about American Cities - Digitization Projects Funded by the NHPRC

Civil War Records - Digitization Projects Supported by the NHPRC

Digitization Projects Made Possible by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC)

With re-cabling work now complete, the Motion Picture Research Room (Room 4000) at Archives II in College Park is now open for normal business hours and operations.

Are you looking for records about the history of housing, lending, and development in American cities? The National Archives hold many records related these issues, and you can find valuable information in a number of our record groups, including:

 

 

In addition to researching federal records, you might also want to research on the state or local level, and many institutions hold collections about individual cities or regions. The National Archives’ National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC - https://www.archives.gov/nhprc) has awarded digitization grants to several organizations across the United States that hold such records, and many of those digital collections are available online for researchers to use.

 

Here are some of the digital collections related to the development of urban areas in America that were made possible by NHPRC grant funding:

 

  • The Law Library of Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, has digitized the Mt. Laurel cases, a collection of legal documents related to a series of cases on affordable housing in New Jersey, and they have also digitized “reports and extensive hearing transcripts of the Lilley Commission, a state commission formed to examine the causes of the civil disorders in Newark and other New Jersey cities in 1967.” Find out more at these sites:

http://njdll.rutgers.edu/handle/123456789/128

http://njdll.rutgers.edu/handle/123456789/1

 

  • The Getty Research Institute has digitized two collections of photographs that “document the growth of housing and urban development in California and the Midwest from 1936 until 1997.” The collections include the Leonard Nadel Papers (Nadel photographed the workers of the Bracero Program) and the Julius Shulman Photography Archive (Shulman is best known for his architectural photographs). Learn more about this digitization project here:

http://www.getty.edu/research/tools/digital_collections/notable/nadel.html

http://www.getty.edu/research/tools/guides_bibliographies/shulman/

 

  • The University Library Special Collections Department at the University of Illinois, Chicago has digitized “photographs of historic Chicago sites, streets, neighborhoods and buildings” from its James S. Parker collection (Parker owned a commercial photography firm in Chicago and managed legal photography for the city) and the Chicago Photographic collection, which “depicts nearly all of Chicago's neighborhoods over several decades, serving as a significant temporal and pictorial documentation of the many changes in Chicago's urban landscape, built environment, and industrial economy, especially during the mid 20th century.” You can find out more at their website: http://collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/uic_pic

 

For more information about digital projects funded by the NHPRC's digitization grants, see these posts:

Digitization Projects Made Possible by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC)

Civil War Records - Digitization Projects Supported by the NHPRC

Are you a researcher who relies on public transportation to get to Archives II? This notice is for you!

 

Metro Surge #14 will close the College Park station from April 15-29. The C-8 bus line runs out of the College Park station and is the only line that services Archives II.

 

During this time, NARA will operate additional shuttle runs between Archives II and the Prince George's Plaza station weekday mornings for the time the College Park Station is closed.

 

The first shuttle will depart Prince George's Plaza for Archives II at 6:45 a.m., and again every 30 minutes until 9:15 a.m.

 

There will also be an additional, final evening shuttle from Archives II to Prince George's Plaza leaving Archives II at 6:00 p.m.

 

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Please see the below map for shuttle pick-up location.

 

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Additionally, the normal shuttle bus departing Archives II will stop at Prince George's Plaza on its way to Archives I at any point during the day. Please tell the shuttle bus driver if you need to be dropped off at Prince George's Plaza.

 

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Facility and Property Management Director Mark Sprouse at mark.sprouse@nara.gov or x73019.

April 6, 2017 marked the 100th anniversary of the U.S. entry into World War I. As the largest repository of American World War I records, the National Archives holds a wealth of records and information documenting the U.S. experience in this conflict, including photographs, documents, audiovisual recordings, educational resources, articles, blog posts, lectures, and exhibits.

 

In commemoration of this event, we’ve launched a World War I research portal with the goal of creating a central space for all National Archives resources and content related to World War I for use by researchers, students and educators, and those curious about the War.

WWI Centennial banner.jpg

 

The portal features records and information documenting the U.S. experience in this conflict, including newly digitized photographs, documents, audiovisual recordings, educational resources, subject guides, lectures, and more. Browse the interactive timeline that includes newly digitized motion pictures, records from battles, major events and everyday activities during the war. It leverages content from across the National Archives and Presidential Libraries, and includes links to all content areas in the Catalog, on archives.gov, and social media.

 

You’ll also find World War I records organized by subject and topic area. Throughout the portal you can find links to more information such as articles, blog posts, genealogy resources, and online exhibits. With 110,000 newly digitized photographs, you’re sure to find something you’ve never seen before!

 

Are you interested in helping make records more discoverable? We’ve created special tagging and transcription missions and challenges using World War I content for our citizen archivists.  Throughout the two year commemoration, we’ll be rotating missions to focus on different aspects of World War I both on the battlefield and on the homefront.  We hope you’ll join us in this special project.

 

Take a look! We'd love to hear your thoughts on the WWI portal. Have you found a unique photo or an interesting record? Please share with us! Email us at citizenarchivist@nara.gov.

In our previous #ResearcherProTip post, Making Reproductions of Records, we detailed what equipment is available for researchers to use for reproductions in the research rooms at both our College Park and Washington D.C. locations. But what if the records you are looking at are oversized and you are unable to copy them on a standard copier? While at both locations you can request for reproductions to be done, the process is different for each site.  If the records are at our location in Washington D.C, the request has to be done through The National Archives reproductions website.  Reproductions are only available on a CD and they cost $25 per reproduction. 

 

At our College Park location, researchers have the option to have oversized reproductions made in our Cartographic Room. If you have records that, once unfolded, are too large to fit safely on the desks in the main Textual Research Room, you can have your materials transferred to the Cartographic Room, where you will have the space to look at the material. The Cartographic Room is equipped with larger tables, where you can open and photograph the records completely.  Step ladders and boards are also available, so you can take photos from a greater height, if necessary.

 

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Shown above: a board that available for researcher use to hang materials for photographing  

     

If you decide that you want copies (paper or digital) made of your records, you can ask any staff member in the room for the Reproduction Request Form.  Instructions on how to complete this form can be found on the back; staff can also guide you through the process.

 

Some things to remember before making the request:

  1. There is a limit of ten scans per researcher each day.
  2. Copy staff only scan material Monday-Friday between 9 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1 p.m.-4:00 p.m.
  3. Your request must be in by 3:30 p.m. to be considered for that day’s scanning, although the queue might already be full and they may ask you to come back the next day.
  4. They cannot scan anything larger than 36 inches wide, or any item that they deem too fragile to go through their scanners.

 

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Shown above: the copier staff uses to make reproductions

 

On your request form you will specify whether you the reproductions to be printed out, put on a CD (NARA Provided), or a Flash Drive (Researcher Provided). Black and white paper reproductions cost $3.50 per linear foot, while color paper copies cost $5.00 per linear foot.  Scanned reproductions cost $3.50 each.  Once the scan is completed, you will be asked to approve and pay for the reproductions, which must be done by 4:00 p.m.

Did you know that as part of its mission to “promote[] the preservation and use of America’s documentary heritage,” the National Archives’ National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC - https://www.archives.gov/nhprc) has awarded digitization grants to institutions across the United States? Many of those institutions have made their digital collections freely available to the public, and they cover a wide range of topics, including the Civil War, environmental activism, social welfare, civil rights, agriculture, advertising, and much more!

 

Here are just a few examples of the variety of digitization projects made possible by the NHPRC:

 

  • The University of Tennessee at Knoxville digitized its collection of interviews conducted with veterans of World War II. The oral histories can be found here: http://digital.lib.utk.edu/collections/wwiioralhistories
  • The University of Iowa digitized its Henry A. Wallace collection. Wallace served as the Secretary of Agriculture from 1933-1950, as the Vice President from 1941-1945, and as the Secretary of Commerce from 1945-1946. You can view this collection here: http://wallace.lib.uiowa.edu/

 

  • The Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, which is part of the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System, worked with the Digital Library of Georgia “to  digitize and make Web-accessible late nineteenth and mid-twentieth century manuscript collections that document the historical development of education for African Americans, primarily in the South, from the early 1860s to the early 1950s.” Check out their collections here: http://www.afpls.org/aarl

 

  • The Aldo Leopold Foundation and the University of Wisconsin at Madison digitized their Aldo Leopold collection. Leopold, the author of A Sand County Almanac (1949) was--among other things--an American environmentalist and forester. You can view the collection here: https://uwdc.library.wisc.edu/collections/aldoleopold/

Yesterday on April 2nd in 1917, President Woodrow Wilson went before Congress and asked for what many in the chambers believed was inevitable; a declaration of war against Germany. European nations had fought for three bloody years across the continent and now the United States was about to enter the conflict. Even though the country was already supplying Allied powers with war materials, they were now about to commit their own troops. As the WWI centennial approaches on April 6th when war was finally declared, government agencies, commissions, and historical organizations across the country are developing educational programs about the role of the US in WWI. This makes learning about the Great War a great time for researchers and history buffs alike.

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If you're passionate learning about the Great War, be sure to post your questions and comments to NARA staff and researchers here on the History Hub. Be sure to check out the Remembering World War 1 group and learn about a new interactive app entitled 'Remembering WWI.' With the app, users can research and utilize an incredible amount of newly digitized WWI materials not only from NARA, but from partner institutions sharing their collections. These innovative approaches to accessing WWI records and connecting with NARA holdings will provide researchers and historians with more readily available information. You can learn more about what kinds of WWI records held by NARA in the Military Records group and if you'd like research assistance, be sure to check out the Researchers Help group as well. You can also post your Research and findings in the Share Your Research group as well.

 

Be sure to check out these groups to learn about more WWI centennial programs:

WWI Centennial Commission: Home - World War I Centennial

National WWI Museum: National World War I Museum and Memorial 

Imperial War Museum: Imperial War Museums 

 

Thank you for using the History Hub and happy researching!