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Genealogy

4 Posts authored by: ckluskens Expert

Ellis Island Processing:  The Case of Nanny [Fanny] Knowles

USCIS History and Genealogy “Your Questions” Webinar

Friday March 25, 2016, 1:00 pm Eastern

A researcher submitted questions about a passenger list documenting Fanny Knowles arrival, hearing, and admission at Ellis Island in 1919.  Thirteen year-old Fanny was excluded as an unaccompanied minor, despite the fact she traveled with her adult sister Edith, who was a US citizen.  How were families processed when some were citizens and some were aliens?  Was Fanny really “alone?”  What resources exist to help explain more about Ellis Island (or other US port of entry) processing?  These and other questions will be discussed and explored in the USCIS “Your Questions” webinar presentation on March 25th, 2016.

Note: this web meeting is not recorded, so be sure to join us live

USCIS is now using Adobe Connect to deliver webinars. If you have never attended an Adobe Connect meeting before:

** Send myself a reminder on this webinar.** - Send myself an email with details and the meeting link

 

Click the button below at 1 pm Eastern on March 25, 2016 to enter the meeting room

 

Do I have to register for the live webinar?No, pre-registration is not required. From our webinar page click the “Attend Session” button which takes you to the door of a virtual meeting room. Enter your name and email to join the meeting, then follow instructions to call the toll-free phone number for audio. If you have not attended before, be sure to join early so the program has time to load. For more information please see our webinar schedule page.

 

Do you have an immigration and naturalization research question?

  • Next “Your Questions” Webinar is Friday, May 27, 2016 1:00 PM (Eastern)
  • Submissions due by May 6, 2016

Submit your question via email to cishistory.library@uscis.dhs.gov with the subject line "Your Questions Webinar.” When doing so, remember:

  • If your question relates to a document you found, attach a copy of the document to the email.
  • Documents submitted with questions may be shared and discussed during the live webinar. Please do not send large or extensive files.
  • Questions must be received at least two weeks prior to the next scheduled session to be included in that session.
  • Multiple questions on the same topic may be grouped together to facilitate presentation of a response.
  • To ensure the hour is of interest to the widest audience, questions answered will be those most commonly asked or that generate the most useful answers.

*US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) “Your Questions” Webinar provides educational responses to record and research questions submitted by genealogical and historical researchers. The presenter is Marian L. Smith and the program focuses on historical immigration and nationality records created by the legacy Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS).

The following message comes from Gen-Fed. Participating in this course will help you take your federal records research skills to a higher level.

 

The Genealogical Institute on Federal Records (Gen-Fed) has announced details on registration, scheduled to open on Saturday, February 27, at 11:00 AM EST. Reservations will be taken online, via 123SignUp, and tuition payment will be due by check within 15 days of making a reservation. Complete instructions are posted here. Read them over and mark your calendars!

Gen-Fed is for experienced genealogists, and for archivists, historians and librarians interested in using federal records for genealogical research. It is designed to instill a methodological framework and foster creative thinking about relevant records. To learn more about this year’s program, visit Gen-Fed 2016, and see the complete program here.

Malissa Ruffner, JD, CGâ„ 
Director

As the National Capital region continues to dig out from two feet (or thereabouts) of snow, it's a good time to reflect on the genealogical uses of Record Group 27, Records of the Weather Bureau.

 

Our farm family ancestors kept close watch of the weather and it certainly affected their economic well-being much more than it does us city dwellers. Today, only 2% of the U.S. population are farm families; in 1790, they comprised at least 90%.

 

While the Weather Bureau was not established until 1890, the federal government's interest in collecting weather information dates back to the 1810s, when army hospital, post, and regimental surgeons were directed to keep diaries of the weather. These duties were transferred in 1870 to officers reporting to the Chief Signal Officer. Meanwhile, from 1847 to 1870, the Smithsonian Institution collected data from voluntary observers throughout the country. All of these observations are available on National Archives Microfilm Publication T907, Climatological Records of the Weather Bureau, 1819-1892 (562 rolls), which is not online.

 

Information about weather can be useful background information that puts flesh on the bones of those ancestors. What was the weather like on the day your ancestor was born? Married? Died? Or at some other point his or her life? You may not find an answer for your precise location, but a nearby one might be close enough. One of my grandfathers was born in November 1888, but his birth was not recorded until the spring of 1889. One suspects weather had something to do with it - even though the winter of 1888-89 was not as epic as that of January-March 1888

.

Our retired colleagues, Constance Potter and Kenneth Heger, used to give a lecture called "Stormy Weather" that was all about the genealogical uses of weather information from federal records. Connie presents some of that information in De Smet, Dakota Territory, Little Town in the National Archives, Part 2.

 

The year 1816 was known as "1800 and Froze to Death" (as well as "The Year without any Summer" and other appellations). It was a year when there was frost or snow in nearly every month, and farmers planted crops two and three times only to see them die. Many farm families from the northern United States moved west in 1817 in hopes of a better future.

 

in 2005, Hurricane Katrina displaced thousands from New Orleans, Louisiana, with many never to return.

 

Weather matters.

 

In addition to T907, other useful federal records are:

 

Nonfederal sources of information include articles in newspapers in the area where your ancestors lived. For example, the Columbus, Ohio, Statesman of February 15, 1842 reprinted a news item from the Cleveland Herald that described a "Terrible Tornado" in Mayfield, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, and Kirtland, Lake County, Ohio, that caused considerable damage. More than 30 people with their losses ("house unroofed," "barn unroofed," "barn demolished," etc.) are mentioned. Local newspapers may be available on microfilm at local public libraries, or in online databases such as GenealogyBank.com and Newspapers.com.

 

May the sun always shine on your genealogical research!

This comes to us from our friends at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services history and genealogy office, and relates to records in the custody of the National Archives and Records Administration, and probably also to records in USCIS custody.

The Curious Case of Albert Miller

USCIS History and Genealogy “Your Questions” Webinar

Friday FEBRUARY 5, 2016, 1:00 pm Eastern

The upcoming USCIS History and Genealogy “Your Questions” presentation will discuss the search for answers in the case of an immigrant who arrived at Philadelphia in 1908. Questions raised by Albert Miller’s naturalization documents lead to additional information in a variety of places and some very surprising results. Join us to learn exactly how Albert arrived in the United States, and how small clues can lead to big discoveries.

Note: this web meeting is not recorded, so be sure to join us live

 

**Send myself a reminder on this webinar.** - Send myself an email with details and the meeting link

 

Click the button below at 1 pm Eastern on Feb. 5, 2016 to enter the meeting room

 

 

Do I have to register for the live webinar?

No, pre-registration is not required. From our webinar page click the “Attend Session” button which takes you to the door of a virtual meeting room. Enter your name and email to join the meeting, then follow instructions to call the toll-free phone number for audio. If you have not attended before, be sure to join early so the program has time to load. For more information please see our webinar schedule page.

 

Do you have an immigration and naturalization research question?

  • Next “Your Questions” Webinar is Friday, March 25, 2016 1:00 PM (Eastern)
  • Submissions due by March 11, 2016

Submit your question via email to cishistory.library@uscis.dhs.gov with the subject line "Your Questions Webinar.” When doing so, remember:

  • If your question relates to a document you found, attach a copy of the document to the email.
  • Documents submitted with questions may be shared and discussed during the live webinar. Please do not send large or extensive files.
  • Questions must be received at least two weeks prior to the next scheduled session to be included in that session.
  • Multiple questions on the same topic may be grouped together to facilitate presentation of a response.
  • To ensure the hour is of interest to the widest audience, questions answered will be those most commonly asked or that generate the most useful answers.

*US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) “Your Questions” Webinar provides educational responses to record and research questions submitted by genealogical and historical researchers. The presenter is Marian L. Smith and the program focuses on historical immigration and nationality records created by the legacy Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS).